For the complete list of news visit us on facebook.

Hammerhead shark migration gives new hope for conservation Summary: Great Hammerhead sharks have been tagged and tracked across the USA and Bahamas in a bid to shed light on their migration habits. Researchers suggest that these sharks are more at risk than previously thought because of their predictable and seasonal migratory patterns. As an endangered species, the Great Hammerhead shark is in desperate need of effective conservation management. This new information will allow marine planners to improve the protection of this iconic animal. Full story: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170224111809.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fplants_animals%2Fsea_life+%28Sea+Life+News+--+ScienceDaily%29 Scientific paper: Tristan L. Guttridge, Maurits P. M. Van Zinnicq Bergmann, Chris Bolte, Lucy A. Howey, Jean S. Finger, Steven T. Kessel, Jill L. Brooks, William Winram, Mark E. Bond, Lance K. B. Jordan, Rachael C. Cashman, Emily R. Tolentino, R. Dean Grubbs, Samuel H. Gruber. Philopatry and Regional Connectivity of the Great Hammerhead Shark, Sphyrna mokarran in the U.S. and Bahamas. Frontiers in Marine Science, 2017; 4 DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2017.00003 Scientists at the Bimini Biological Research Station in the Bahamas show the laser photogrammetry technique in action: pointing two lasers of a known distance (20cm) parallel to the shark. This is a non-invasive technique in which we can accurately estimate the size of sensitive animals, such as the great hammerhead shark. Credit: Copyright Eugene Kitsios for Bimini Biological Research Station
Timeline Photos
Here, the authors demonstrate by cell lineage tracing that the gills of a cartilaginous fish, the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), are in fact endodermally derived. This finding supports the homology of gills in cyclostomes and gnathostomes, and a single origin of pharyngeal gills prior to the divergence of these two ancient vertebrate lineages. open access :-) GILLIS, J.A. & TIDSWELL, O.R. 2017 The Origin of Vertebrate Gills. Current Biology, in press http://www.cell.com/current-biology/abstract/S0960-9822(17)30023-4 Somebody who could support our database with images of Leucoraja erinacea? Please send your images of "Leucoraja erinacea" to info@shark-references.com Leucoraja erinacea (MITCHILL, 1825), Image of the original description
Timeline Photos
Basking sharks seek out winter sun Date: February 20, 2017 Source: University of Exeter Summary: The winter habits of Britain's basking sharks have been revealed for the first time. Scientists have discovered some spend their winters off Portugal and North Africa, some head to the Bay of Biscay and others choose a staycation around the UK and Ireland. Read the full story: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170220084153.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fplants_animals%2Ffisheries+%28Fisheries+News+--+ScienceDaily%29 image: Cetorhinus maximus (GUNNERUS, 1765), © Chris Gotschalk, wikipedia http://shark-references.com/species/view/Cetorhinus-maximus
Timeline Photos
open access! Thanks to Carlos Bustamante for this new paper! The longnose skates (Zearaja chilensis and Dipturus trachyderma) are the main component of the elasmobranch fisheries in the south-east Pacific Ocean. Both species are considered to be a single stock by the fishery management in Chile however, little is known about the level of demographic connectivity within the fishery. In this study, the authors used a genetic variation (560 bp of the control region of the mitochondrial genome and ten microsatellite loci) to explore population connectivity at five locations along the Chilean coast. VARGAS-CARO, C. & BUSTAMANTE, C. & BENNETT, M.B. & OVENDEN, J.R. 2017 Towards sustainable fishery management for skates in South America: The genetic population structure of Zearaja chilensis and Dipturus trachyderma (Chondrichthyes, Rajiformes) in the south-east Pacific Ocean. PLoS ONE, 12 (2): e0172255 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0172255&type=printable http://shark-references.com/species/view/Zearaja-chilensis http://shark-references.com/species/view/Dipturus-trachydermus image by the authors
Timeline Photos
This new paper aimed to study and compare the hematology of newborns, young, subadults, adult males, adult females and pregnant females of Potamotrygon wallacei (cururu stingray), Potamotrygon motoro and Paratrygon aiereba. Thanks to Paulo Aride for the paper! DE OLIVEIRA, A.T. & SANTOS, M.Q.D. & DE ARAUJO, M.L.G. & DE LEMOS, J.R.G. & SALES, R.S.D. & ARIDE, P.H.R. & PANTOJA-LIMA, J. & TAVARES-DIAS, M. & MARCON, J.L. 2016 Hematological parameters of three freshwater stingray species (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae) in the middle Rio Negro, Amazonas state. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 69: 33-40 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305197816301636 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Potamotrygon-motoro image: Potamotrygon motoro, ANSP 194501, field no. iXIN13-EXP1-31 Brazil: Pará: rio Xingu, beach and main channel in vicinity of campsite 10 on right bank, ca. 7 km north of Senador José Porfírio. 2°31'31.62''S, 51°57'47.64''W, 23 Sep 2013, M. Sabaj et al.; © Mark Sabaj Pérez (iXingu Project, NSF DEB-1257813)
Timeline Photos
Dr. Frances Humber, Conservation Director, www.blueventures.org sent me this new paper! Highlights The traditional fishery in SW Madagascar estimated at 65–104,000 sharks per annum. >20 species of shark were recorded, with all species/families on the IUCN Red List. 31% were Sphyrna lewini (scalloped hammerhead) and are listed as Endangered. There was a significant decrease in the average size of sharks landed. Participatory monitoring can help to remove data deficiency from SSF. HUMBER, F. & ANDRIAMAHAINO, E.T. & BERIZINY, T. & BOTOSOAMANANTO, R. & GODLEY, B.J. & GOUGH, C. & PEDRON, S. & RAMAHERY, V. & BRODERICK, A.C. 2017 Assessing the small-scale shark fishery of Madagascar through community-based monitoring and knowledge. Fisheries Research, 186 (1): 131-143 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016578361630265X image: African Dwarf Sawshark, Pristiophorus nancyae, Ebert & Cailliet, 2011, near Maputo, Mozambique © Protect Africa's Sawfishes/M. Padera http://shark-references.com/species/view/Pristiophorus-nancyae
Timeline Photos
Many thanks to Cassidy D. Peterson for this new paper! The authors used delta-lognormal generalized linear models (GLMs) to generate indices of abundance for seven Atlantic coastal shark species from six fishery-independent surveys along the US east coast and Gulf of Mexico from 1975 to 2014. PETERSON, C.D. & BELCHER, C.N. & BETHEA, D.M. & DRIGGERS, W.B. & FRAZIER, B.S. & LATOUR, R.J. 2017 Preliminary recovery of coastal sharks in the south-east United States. Fish and Fisheries, in press http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1111/faf.12210/abstract http://shark-references.com/species/view/Carcharhinus-plumbeus image: Carcharhinus plumbeus (NARDO, 1827), © Randall, J.E.
Timeline Photos
😢 without comment 😢
70 Endangered Giant Stingrays Die Mysteriously
The huge freshwater fish may have been killed by pollution in Thailand's Mae Klong River.
New software will standardize data collection for great white sharks Source: Stellenbosch University Summary: The lack of a standardized procedure for collecting data about elusive and hard to find species like the great white shark has to date seriously hampered efforts to manage and protect these animals. But now a marine biologist, an applied mathematician and a software developer joined expertise to develop a custom-made software package, called Identifin, which may offer a solution to this problem. read the full story: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170213131401.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fplants_animals%2Fmarine_biology+%28Marine+Biology+News+--+ScienceDaily%29 image: The custom-made software uses the complete database for comparing the matches and then organizes them in order of similarity, from left to right. There is also an embedded function in the software to create a matrix of the history of recaptures. This information can be used to estimate population numbers. Credit: Sara Andreotti, Identifin
Timeline Photos
New images for our project Toothmorphology (http://shark-references.com/post/523)! Thanks to Ross Robertson, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama please visit Alopias pelagicus NAKAMURA, 1935 new! http://shark-references.com/post/702 Alopias superciliosus (LOWE, 1841) new! http://shark-references.com/post/703 Alopias vulpinus (BONNATERRE, 1788) new! http://shark-references.com/post/704 Echinorhinus brucus (BONNATERRE, 1788) new images! http://shark-references.com/post/602 Echinorhinus cookei PIETSCHMANN, 1928 new images! http://shark-references.com/post/603 Rhizoprionodon lalandii (MÜLLER & HENLE, 1839) new images! http://shark-references.com/post/681 Rhizoprionodon longurio (JORDAN & GILBERT, 1882) new images! http://shark-references.com/post/682 Rhizoprionodon porosus (POEY, 1861) new images! http://shark-references.com/post/683 Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (RICHARDSON, 1836) new images! http://shark-references.com/post/684
Photos from Shark-references's post
Many thanks to Daniela Waltrick for the image of Australian sharpnose shark and the new paper! In this study, the available information on the histology of the elasmobranch secondary ovarian follicles derived from atresia (preovulatory follicles) or ovulation (postovulatory follicles) is reviewed highlighting their morphology and steroidogenic capacity. Based on this literature review, the ovarian follicles of the Australian sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon taylori were classified according to their preovulatory or postovulatory origin. WALTRICK, D.S. & SIMPFENDORFER, C.A. & AWRUCH, C.A. 2017 A review on the morphology of ovarian follicles in elasmobranchs: A case study in Rhizoprionodon taylori. Journal of Morphology, in press http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jmor.20644/abstract #DaniWaltrick http://shark-references.com/species/view/Rhizoprionodon-taylori
Timeline Photos
Claudio Barria sent me a 50 day free downloadlink for his latest paper: Plastic debris straps on threatened blue shark Prionace glauca https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1UWOm,ashmIYV Highlights • Blue shark Prionace glauca entangled with polyolefin strapping bands. • Interaction between plastic debris and threatened sharks • Citizen science: the potential of citizens as scientific collaborators. image: Prionace glauca (LINNAEUS, 1758), © Mark Conlin, SWFSC Large Pelagics Program
Timeline Photos
Thanks to Pradip Patade, India for this image of Glaucostegus obtusus MÜLLER & HENLE, 1841 from Maharashtra Arabian sea at Harnay Murud sandy beach, India, disc size is around 5 inches http://shark-references.com/species/view/Glaucostegus-obtusus
Timeline Photos
New images for our database :-) Thanks to Marta Coll and Joan Navarro, Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM-SCIC), Barcelona, Spain for the support! Raja asterias DELAROCHE, 1809 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Raja-asterias
Photos from Shark-references's post
The Newsletter February is now online! http://shark-references.com/post/705 Subscribe to our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/sJNGb image: Cat Shark, 1800, The Naturalist's Pocket Magazine or compleat cabinet of the curiosities and beauties of nature. http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/47300753#page/48/mode/1up
Timeline Photos
Thanks to Dr. Carlos Julio Polo Silva for the following new paper: ZEICHNER, S.S. & COLMAN, A.S. & KOCH, P.L. & POLO-SILVA, C. & GALVÁN-MAGAÑA, F. & KIM, S.L. 2017 Discrimination Factors and Incorporation Rates for Organic Matrix in Shark Teeth Based on a Captive Feeding Study. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, in press In this study, the authors analyze δ13C and δ15N values of the organic matrix in leopard shark teeth (Triakis semifasciata) from a captive experiment and report discrimination factors as well as incorporation rates. We found differences in tooth discrimination factors for individuals fed different prey sources. image: Triakis semifasciata GIRARD, 1855, SIO 62-213, 1035 mm TL, collected on 4/20/1962 from water approximately 4 m deep in the south arm of Bahia de Los Angeles, Baja California, Mexico using a 150-ft seine bag © Digital Fish Library, http://www.digitalfishlibrary.org// http://shark-references.com/species/view/Triakis-semifasciata
Timeline Photos
Thanks to Joan Navarro for a new paper about the Starry ray Raja asterias DELAROCHE, 1809. NAVARRO, J. & COLL, M. 2017 Hábitos tróficos, papel ecológico y distribución espacial de la raya estrellada, una especie endémica del Mediterráneo. [in Spain] Quercus, 317: 26-32 [in Spain] http://www.revistaquercus.es/noticia/6743/articulos-de-fondo/la-raya-estrellada-una-especie-endemica-del-mediterraneo.html http://shark-references.com/species/view/Raja-asterias
Timeline Photos
A new, open access paper about Flora and Faunas, and Paleoecology of the Alajuela Formation, Late Miocene of Panama The authors present an integrated study of the geological and paleontological context and age of a new locality from Lago Alajuela in northern Panama (Caribbean side) containing late Miocene marine and terrestrial fossils (plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates) from the Alajuela Formation. MACFADDEN, B.J. & JONES, D.S. & JUD, N.A. & MORENO-BERNAL, J.W. & MORGAN, G.S. & PORTELL, R.W. & A. PEREZ, V.J. & MORAN, S.M. & WOOD, A.R. 2017 Integrated Chronology, Flora and Faunas, and Paleoecology of the Alajuela Formation, Late Miocene of Panama. PLoS ONE, 12 (1): e0170300 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0170300 image by the authors, A. UF-V 318900, Carcharocles megalodon, right upper anterior tooth, lingual view. B. UF-V 319140, Hemipristis serra, right upper tooth, lingual view. C. UF-V 319139, Sphyrna mokarran, tooth, lingual view. D. UF-V 318917, Carcharhinus sp., right upper tooth, lingual view. E. UF-V 318927, Negaprion brevirostris, lower tooth, lingual view. F. UF-V 319131, Myliobatidae, partial tooth, ventral view.
Timeline Photos
A new described Ghost Shark! Thanks to Kristin Walovich for this new paper and the permission to use the image of the holotype at shark-references! A new species of chimaerid, Hydrolagus erithacus sp. nov., is described from nine specimens collected from the southeast Atlantic and southwest Indian oceans from depths of 470–1,000 meters. WALOVICH, K.A. & EBERT, D.A. & KEMPER, J.M. 2017 Hydrolagus erithacus sp. nov. (Chimaeriformes: Chimaeridae), a new species of chimaerid from the southeastern Atlantic and southwestern Indian oceans. Zootaxa, 4226 (4): 509–520 http://biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4226.4.4 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Hydrolagus-erithacus
Timeline Photos
Important news about hammerhead shark's
Discovered: Possible new species of hammerhead shark
DNA finding could have major implications for conservation Scientists have discovered what they believe to be a new species of hammerhead shark, prompting
New open access paper about sawfishes! Thanks to Ruth Leeney for this reference! This paper summarises historical records of sawfishes in Mozambican waters and presents the findings of the first assessment of the presence and status of sawfishes in Mozambique. LEENEY, R.H. 2017 Are sawfishes still present in Mozambique? A baseline ecological study. PeerJ, 5: e2950 https://peerj.com/articles/2950.pdf http://shark-references.com/species/view/Pristis-zijsron http://shark-references.com/species/view/Pristis-pristis image: Pristis pristis (LINNAEUS, 1758), eye © David Morgan, Freshwater Fish Group & Fish Health Unit, School of Veterinary & Life Sciences, Murdoch, Australia
Timeline Photos
Large marine protected areas effectively protect reef shark populations, Stanford scientists find Researchers at Stanford’s Hopkins Marine Station find that expanded marine protected areas are successful in limiting fishing and increasing reef shark populations. full story: http://news.stanford.edu/2017/01/31/large-marine-protected-areas-effectively-protect-reef-shark-populations-stanford-scientists-find/ paper: Timothy D. White, Aaron B. Carlisle, David A. Kroodsma, Barbara A. Block, Renato Casagrandi, Giulio A. De Leo, Marino Gatto, Fiorenza Micheli, Douglas J. McCauley. Assessing the effectiveness of a large marine protected area for reef shark conservation. Biological Conservation, 2017; 207: 64 DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2017.01.009 image: Researchers Kosta Stamoulis of the Palmyra Atoll Research Consortium and the University of Hawaii and Tim White of Stanford’s Hopkins Marine Station measure a grey reef shark. (Image credit: Courtesy Palmyra Atoll Research Consortium)
Timeline Photos

For the complete list of news visit us on facebook.