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Many thanks to Eric Clua for this new paper about the first record of a Sicklefin lemon shark (Negaprion acutidens) in the Chesterfield reefs (Coral Sea, Western Central Pacific). CLUA, E. & IMIRIZALDU, M. 2017 First record of the sicklefin lemon shark (Negaprion acutidens) in the Chesterfield reefs (Coral Sea, Western Central Pacific). Cybium, 41 (1): 67-68 http://sfi.mnhn.fr/cybium/numeros/2017/411/7-Clua%20962[Cybium%202017,%20411]67-68%20Abs.pdf http://shark-references.com/species/view/Negaprion-acutidens image: Sicklefin lemon shark (Negaprion acutidens) in Maldives (Baa atoll) by Julien Bide
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This newly described chondrichthyan fauna from the late Miocene Chucunaque Formation of Lago Bayano reveals a prolific and highly diverse assemblage from Panama, and one of the richest shark faunas from the Neotropics. Strontium geochronology indicates an age of 10–9.5 Ma for the chonrichthyan-bearing strata. Thanks a lot to Catalina Pimiento and Victor Perez for this new paper and the permission to use the amazing image! PEREZ, V.J. & PIMIENTO, C. & HENDY, A. & GONZÁLEZ-BARBA, G. 2017 Late Miocene chondrichthyans from Lago Bayano, Panama: Functional diversity, environment and biogeography. Journal of Paleontology, in press https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-paleontology/article/late-miocene-chondrichthyans-from-lago-bayano-panama-functional-diversity-environment-and-biogeography/80F00F87CA1CFF655E3CFD07E368638C
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Many thanks to Momigliano Paolo Massimo for this new paper and the free download link (http://rdcu.be/rsLt)! Using samples from Australia, Indonesia and oceanic reefs in the Indian Ocean, the authors established that large oceanic distances represent barriers to gene flow, whereas genetic differentiation on continental shelves follows an isolation by distance model. MOMIGLIANO, P. & HARCOURT, R. & ROBBINS, W.D. & JAITEH, V. & MAHARDIKA, G.N. & SEMBIRING, A. & STOW, A. 2017 Genetic structure and signatures of selection in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos). Heredity, in press http://www.nature.com/hdy/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/hdy201721a.html http://shark-references.com/species/view/Carcharhinus-amblyrhynchos image: Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos (BLEEKER, 1856); © Shin Sirachai Arunrugstichai, Center for Biodiversity in Peninsular Thailand, Yai Songkla, Thailand
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Two really amazing pics!
Eagle ray flies out the water to escape hammerhead shark in Panama
A tourist has captured the moment when an eagle ray flew out of water to escape the deadly jaws of a hammerhead shark.
Occurrence, abundance and size trends of 25 demersal Chondrichthyes (10 Sharks: 3 Carcharhiniformes, 2 Hexanchiformes, 5 Squaliformes; 14 Batoids: 3 Myliobatiformes, 8 Rajiformes, 3 Torpediniformes and 1 Holocephalan: 1 Chimaeriformes) collected from 22 years (1994–2015) of Mediterranean International Trawl Surveys (MEDITS) around Sardinian seas, were given. Data relative to two strata, the continental shelf (10–200 m), the slope (201–800 m), and the overall (10–800 m), were analyzed in order to identify the general species distribution of their habitat preference. Thanks to Martina F. Marongiu for this new paper! MARONGIU, M.F. & PORCU, C. & BELLODI, A. & CANNAS, R. & CAU, A. & CUCCU, D. & MULAS, A. & FOLLESA, M.C. 2017 Temporal dynamics of demersal chondrichthyan species in the central western Mediterranean Sea: The case study in Sardinia Island. Fisheries Research, 193: 81–94 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783617300929 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Heptranchias-perlo image: Heptranchias perlo (BONNATERRE, 1788) caught off Cochin, India
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The newsletter 2017 is now online! http://shark-references.com/post/711 You have information for the monthly newsletter? Please send an email (info@shark-references.com) Enjoy it :-) To subscribe to our newsletter please visit: http://eepurl.com/sJNGb
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New update for our project "Toothmorphology" (http://shark-references.com/post/523) I just added the four species of the Family Hexanchidae! Enjoy it and we wish our friends, followers and supporters Happy Easter! Many thanks to Ross Robertson, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama and Jacques Herman, Beigem (Grimbergen), Belgique for the images! Please support our project and send your images to info@shark-references.com! Heptranchias perlo (BONNATERRE, 1788) (http://shark-references.com/post/707) Hexanchus griseus (BONNATERRE, 1788) (http://shark-references.com/post/708) Hexanchus nakamurai TENG, 1962 (http://shark-references.com/post/709) Notorynchus cepedianus (PÉRON, 1807) (http://shark-references.com/post/710)
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For the first time in 17 years of Florida-based research, scientists have discovered a mating ground for the Endangered smalltooth sawfish.
Researchers Discover Critical Clue in the Mystery of Sawfish Mating | The Ocean Foundation
. For the first time in 17 years of Florida-based research, scientists have discovered a mating ground for the Endangered smalltooth sawfish. During an expedition early April to the shallow-water back-country of Everglades National Park, a research team captured, tagged, and released three adult saw...
The feeding habits and trophic ecology of Mustelus lunulatus and Mustelus henlei in the central coast of the Colombian Pacific were evaluated and compared to determine whether there was trophic niche overlap or resource partitioning between these two sympatric shark species. A total of 59 prey items were identified and grouped into 10 taxonomic categories. Mustelus lunulatus fed in large proportion on Stomatopoda and Brachyura, whereas M. henlei fed almost exclusively on Teleostei. Dendrobranchiata, Cephalopoda, Anomura and Polychaeta complemented the diets of both species. Thanks to Andrés Navia for this new paper! AMARILES, D.F. & NAVIA, A.F. & GIRALDO, A. 2017 Food resource partitioning of the Mustelus lunulatus and Mustelus henlei (Elasmobranchii: Carcharhiniformes).Environmental Biology of Fishes, in press https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10641-017-0598-x http://shark-references.com/species/view/Mustelus-henlei http://shark-references.com/species/view/Mustelus-lunulatus image: Mustelus lunulatus JORDAN & GILBERT, 1882, (viejitas o mamonas) Ecuador © Colombo Estupiñán Montaño,Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas - CICIMAR
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Javier Guallart from the L'Elasmogrup University of Valencia sent me some images of Galeorhinus galeus (LINNAEUS, 1758)! http://shark-references.com/species/view/Galeorhinus-galeus Thanks a lot for this images and the support! Please support our project. Users can participate in many ways: - Please send us missing references. - Send us your publications that are not incorporated so far (which is indicated by the missing info symbol at the quotation). - Pictures of sharks, skates, rays and chimaeras are needed. Authors will be credited. - Should you notice mistakes, encounter incomplete links, or experience any access problems, please let us know. - You have information for the monthly newsletter? Please send an email. - Subscribe to our monthly newsletter (http://eepurl.com/sJNGb), or visit us on facebook (Shark-references) regularly, and tell your friends.
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Rodrigo Figueroa sent me a paper about new Permian shark fin spins from Brazil! Thanks for this new reference and the permission to use the image for this post and our next newsletter (http://shark-references.com/post/indexNewsletter for subscribe our newsletter please use: http://eepurl.com/sJNGb). FIGUEROA, R.T. & GALLO, V. 2017 New chondrichthyan fin spines from the Pedra de Fogo Formation, Brazil. Journal of South American Earth Sciences, in press http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0895981117300275 image Sphenacanthus ignis sp. nov. by Rodrigo Figueroa
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A chondrichthyan assemblage is described from the Early Permian (Artinskian and Kungurian) of Mechetlino Quarry (Bashkortostan, South Urals). The teeth of a new genus of symmoriiform shark are described as Kungurodus, the internal structure of which is reconstructed using microtomography. Many thanks to Alexander Ivanov for this new paper and the permission to use the image of the new genus! IVANOV, A.O. 2016 Chondrichthyans from the Lower Permian of Mechetlino, South Urals, Russia. Bulletin of Geosciences, 91 (4): 717–729 image: Kungurodus obliquus (Ivanov, 2005), teeth. A–C – PM SPU 76-1, sample 5919-2b, A – occlusal, B – lingual and C – oblique lateral views; D, E – PM SPU 76-2, sample 5919-2b, D – oblique labial and E – oblique basal views; F – PM SPU 76-3, sample 5919-4b, oblique labial view;
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The school shark (Galeorhinus galeus) is a migratory species that is occasionally taken as bycatch when targeting gummy shark, and the stock is currently managed under a rebuilding strategy. We used pop-up satellite archival tags (PSAT) to investigate the survival, movements, and habitat use of mature female school shark (147–170 cm total length) following capture and release from demersal automatic longlines. Thanks to Paul Rogers for this new paper! Somebody who would share nice pic of Galeorhinus galeus for our database? ROGERS, P.J. & KNUCKEY, I. & HUDSON, R.J. & LOWTHER, A.D. & GUIDA, L. 2017 Post-release survival, movement, and habitat use of school shark Galeorhinus galeus in the Great Australian Bight, southern Australia. Fisheries Research, 187: 188–198 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783616303964 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Galeorhinus-galeus image: Galeorhinus galeus (LINNAEUS, 1758) © SÉBASTIEN ENAULT, Kraniata Osteology)
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The Angelshark (Squatina squatina) has been eliminated throughout much of its historical range over the past century and is listed as Critically Endangered on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species (Ferretti et al. 2015). However, the Angelshark is still frequently encountered in the Canary Island archipelago, giving hope that this species can be saved from extinction. As such, the protection of this species in its last remaining stronghold is of upmost importance. Thanks to Eva MEyers for the Angelshark Action Plan for the Canary Islands! free download: https://angelsharkproject.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/angelshark-action-plan-for-the-canary-islands.pdf follow the updates of the Action Plan: http://saveourseas.com/update/an-actionplan-for-angelsharks/ http://shark-references.com/species/view/Squatina-squatina
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Highlights: • Bahia Sebastian Vizcaino is a white shark nursery area. • Highest incidental catches of immature white sharks occur during summer. • Northern Baja California seems to be a migration corridor for juvenile white sharks. Thanks to Kady Lyons for this paper! ONATE-GONZALEZ, E.C. & SOSA-NISHIZAKI, O. & HERZKA, S.Z. & LOWE, C.G. & LYONS, K. & SANTANA-MORALES, O. & SEPULVEDA, C. & GUERRERO-AVILA, C. & GARCIA-RODRIGUEZ, E. & O'SULLIVAN, J.B. 2017 Importance of Bahia Sebastian Vizcaino as a nursery area for white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in the Northeastern Pacific: A fishery dependent analysis. Fisheries Research, 188: 125–137 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783616304337 image: Carcharodon carcharias (LINNAEUS, 1758), © FAO, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Ebert, D.A. 2014. On Board Guide for the Identification of Pelagic Sharks and Rays of the Western Indian Ocean. Reproduced with permission, illustration by Marc Dando, Wildlife Illustrator http://shark-references.com/species/view/Carcharodon-carcharias
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Many thanks to Aline Poscai for this new paper and one of the attached images! The nictitating membrane is an anatomic structure exclusively exhibited by Carcharhiniformes, the largest order among sharks. Here the authors present a detailed description of morphological characteristics of the nictitating membrane through light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in the following shark species: Carcharhinus limbatus, Galeocerdo cuvier, Prionace glauca, Rhizoprionodon lalandii, R. porosus, Sphyrna lewini and S. zygaena. POSCAI, A.N., DE SOUSA RANGEL, B., DA SILVA CASAS, A.L. & WOSNICK, N. & RODRIGUES, A. & RICI, R.E.G. & KFOURY, J.R. 2017 Microscopic aspects of the nictitating membrane in Carcharhinidae and Sphyrnidae sharks: a preliminary study. Zoomorphology, in press https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00435-017-0351-1?wt_mc=Internal.Event.1.SEM.ArticleAuthorOnlineFirst images: Carcharhinus limbatus, is the nictitating membrane (denticles) by Aline Poscai; second one: Eye of Blue Shark, Prionace glauca, showing the nictitating membrane by Joxerra Aihartza, wiki
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Brit Finucci sent me some amazing images of two poorly known deep-sea chimaeras (Harriotta raleighana and Rhinochimaera pacifica)! Thanks a lot for this images! http://shark-references.com/species/view/Harriotta-raleighana http://shark-references.com/species/view/Rhinochimaera-pacifica
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Enjoy this two amazing images of a Whale shark feeding on krills, and a spinner shark in a reef from Maldives. Thanks a lot to Shin Sirachai Arunrugstichai for this two images! http://shark-references.com/species/view/Carcharhinus-brevipinna http://shark-references.com/species/view/Rhincodon-typus
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III Sharks International
III SHARKS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE João Pessoa, 3-8 June, 2018 The Sharks International Conference is the first truly international event devoted to elasmobranchs, and its first two editions were held respectively in Cairns, Australia in 2010 and Durban, South Africa in 2014. The city of João Pessoa was chosen as the venue for this important event, which will also congregate members of the Brazilian Society for the Study of Elasmobranchs (SBEEL) and the American Elasmobranch Society (AES) in 2018. More information and an internet site of the event will soon be available. We hope to have many participants from all over the world. See you there!
The diet of the small-spotted catshark Scyliorhinus canicula, captured in the Aegean Sea by bottom-trawl from 2006 to 2012, was investigated with respect to sex, maturity condition, sampling location and season. The stomach contents of 432 specimens, measuring from 144 to 517 mm in total length, were analysed. The identified prey items belonged to eight major groups: Teleostei, Chondrichthyes, Crustacea, Cephalopoda, Annelida, Echinodermata, phanerogams and macroalgae, with Teleostei, Crustacea and Cephalopoda being the most consumed in both females (%W = 48.1, 16.0 and 31.4, respectively) and males (%W = 33.9, 31.6 and 29.8, respectively). Thanks to Vasiliki Kousteni for this paper! KOUSTENI, V. & KARACHLE, P.K. & MEGALOFONOU, P. 2017 Diet of the small-spotted catshark Scyliorhinus canicula in the Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean). Marine Biology Research, 13 (2): 161–173 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17451000.2016.1239019 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Scyliorhinus-canicula image: Scyliorhinus canicula (LINNAEUS, 1758) Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Karlsruhe, Germany, © H. Zell, wiki
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• Reproductive biology of two poorly known deep-sea chimaeras H. raleighana and R. pacifica is described. • Both species matured at a large proportion of their maximum length, suggesting late maturation. • Sperm storage tubules (SSTs) and sperm bundles were identified in the terminal zone of the oviducal gland. • Sexual dimorphism in snout length was found in H. raleighana, suggesting the snout is a male secondary sexual characteristic. • All known publications on holocephalan reproduction are reviewed. FINUCCI, B. & DUNN, M.R. & JONES, E.G. & ANDERSON, J. 2017 Reproductive biology of the two deep-sea chimaerids, longnose spookfish (Harriotta raleighana) and Pacific spookfish (Rhinochimaera pacifica). Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, 120: 76–87 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967063716301972 Brit Finucci: do you have some images of this two species for our database?? http://shark-references.com/species/view/Harriotta-raleighana http://shark-references.com/species/view/Rhinochimaera-pacifica image: Harriotta raleighana GOODE & BEAN, 1895, upper dentition, adult, deep (1500-200m), Rockall Trough, NW Scotland, © Charlie Underwood, Natural History Museum, London
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News about the Cuban dogfish (Squalus cubensis) • We design and implement a release-cage mechanism to reduce predation. • We deploy PSAT’s to track the vertical movements of Cuban dogfish. • The cage protected animals from predation, during their return to depth. • Four of seven Cuban dogfish were tracked for the 14-day deployment duration. • Animals performed diel vertical migrations, residing shallower during the night. • Three animals were consumed by predators, which occurred during daytime SHIPLEY, O.N. & HOWEY, L.A. & TOLENTINO, E.R. & JORDAN, L.K.B. & BROOKS, E.J. 2017 Novel techniques and insights into the deployment of pop-up satellite archival tags on a small-bodied deep-water chondrichthyan. Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, 119: 81–90 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967063716302849 image: Squalus cubensis Howell Rivero, 1936 © Brendan Talwar
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A new paper about the Pacific angelshark! Thanks to Sergio Ramírez-Amaro for this new paper and the image of Squatina californica AYRES, 1859! In this study the authors assess the genetic structure and demographic history of the Pacific angel shark, Squatina californica, along the northwestern coast of Mexico using the mitochondrial control region. Results showed high levels of genetic diversity and reveal genetic differentiation between the samples from the Pacific coast of the Baja California Peninsula and those from the Gulf of California. RAMÍREZ-AMARO, S. & RAMÍREZ-MACÍAS, D. & VÁZQUEZ-JUÁREZ, R. & FLORES-RAMÍREZ, S. & GALVÁN-MAGAÑA, F. & GUTIÉRREZ-RIVERA, J.N. 2017 Population structure of the Pacific angel shark (Squatina californica) along the northwestern coast of Mexico based on the mitochondrial DNA control region. Ciencias Marinas, 43(1): 69–80 http://www.cienciasmarinas.com.mx/index.php/cmarinas/article/view/2692 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Squatina-californica
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Thanks a lot to Sergio Ramirez for this new open access paper and the image for our database! ORDINES, F. & BARO, J. & RAMÍREZ-AMARO, S. & SERENA, F. & SOBRINO, I. 2017 First substantiated record of Raja asterias Delaroche, 1809 (Elasmobranchii: Rajiformes: Rajidae) in the Gulf of Cádiz, North-eastern Atlantic. Acta Ichthyol. Piscat., 47 (1): 101–106 http://www.aiep.pl/volumes/2010/8_1/pdf/13_2161_F1.pdf The Mediterranean starry ray, Raja asterias, considered endemic in the Mediterranean, has recently been reported by other authors from Atlantic fisheries in southern Portugal and northern Morocco. There has been, however, no substantiated record of the species outside the Mediterranean. http://shark-references.com/species/view/Raja-asterias
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