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Thanks to David Morgan for this new paper! Detailed computational fluid dynamics simulations for the rostrum of three species of sawfish (Pristidae) revealed that negligible turbulent flow is generated from all rostra during lateral swipe prey manipulation and swimming. These results suggest that sawfishes are effective stealth hunters that may not be detected by their teleost prey's lateral line sensory system during pursuits. BRADNEY, D.R. & DAVIDSON, A. & EVANS, S.P. & WUERINGER, B.E. & MORGAN, D.L. & CLAUSEN, P.D. 2017 Sawfishes stealth revealed using computational fluid dynamics. Journal of Fish Biology, in press http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jfb.13255/full http://shark-references.com/species/view/Pristis-pristis Pristis pristis (LINNAEUS, 1758), © David Morgan, Freshwater Fish Group & Fish Health Unit, School of Veterinary & Life Sciences, Murdoch, Australia, www.freshwaterfishgroup.com
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New record of a Great White (Carcharodon carcharias) off Morocco. Thanks to Javier Guallart for this post http://shark-references.com/species/view/Carcharodon-carcharias
Javier
New information (with some corrections) about the GW found at the coasts of Morocco. The specimen was not found floating (as we said) but was accidentally captured in a gillnet (a net “fixed” in the bottom). The net was set on Friday, March 17, "about 200 m from the coast" and "15-20 m depth" near the beach of R'Hach, in the Bay of Al-Hoceima. Due to the bad weather the net was moved by the currents and the fisherman did not find it until Monday, March 21. He found the shark trapped not in the net but in the ropes at its end; and with evidences of being dead for several days. This would explain why it had almost no teeth in the picture: or they fell down or were taken away very easily. Finally the fishermen decided to tow the body offshore. Thanks to Mohamed El Andalossi, from AZIR "Association pour l'environnement", for the effort to obtain as detailed information as possible of this record.
The internal anatomy of the barbels of the common sawshark Pristiophorus cirratus was examined with light microscopy to clarify their sensory role. No sensory structures such as taste buds (chemoreception), ampullae of Lorenzini (electroreception) or free neuromasts (lateral line mechanoreception) could be located in the barbels. The presence of bundles of nerve fibres, however, indicates a tactile function for the barbels. NEVATTE, R.J. & WILLIAMSON, J.E. & VELLA, N.G.F. & RAOULT, V. & WUERINGER, B.E. 2017 Morphometry and microanatomy of the barbels of the common sawshark Pristiophorus cirratus (Pristiophoridae): implications for pristiophorid behaviour. Journal of Fish Biology, in press http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jfb.13275/full http://shark-references.com/species/view/Pristiophorus-cirratus image: Pristiophorus cirratus (LATHAM, 1794), male, 95 cm TL, Victoria, Australia © Vincent Raoult, Marine Ecology Group, Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Australia
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The next new described species, a new lanternshark from Papua New Guinea! David Ebert sent me this new paper and the image! Thanks for this! The new species Etmopterus samadiae (Squaliformes: Etmopteridae) resembles other members of the “Etmopterus lucifer” clade in having linear rows of dermal denticles and most closely resembles E. brachyurus from the western North Pacific. The new species occurs along insular slopes between 340 and 785 m depth. WHITE, W.T. & EBERT, D.A. & MANA, R.R. & CORRIGAN, S. 2017 Etmopterus samadiae n. sp., a new lanternshark (Squaliformes: Etmopteridae) from Papua New Guinea. Zootaxa, 4244 (3): 339–354 http://biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4244.3.3 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Etmopterus-samadiae
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A new arhynchobatin skate, Notoraja sereti n. sp., is described based on three specimens collected from off Madang (Papua New Guinea) at depths of 800–980 m. Many thanks to Will White and Peter Last for this new paper and the permission to use the image of the holotype! WHITE, W.T. & LAST, P.R. & MANA, R.R. 2017 A new species of velvet skate, Notoraja sereti n.sp. (Rajiformes: Arhynchobatidae) from Papua New Guinea. Zootaxa, 4244 (2): 219–230 http://biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4244.2.4 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Notoraja-sereti
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Thank's a lot to Johann Mourier for this new paper! The authors performed a social network analysis in a reef shark population (Blacktip reef shark ) to assess the vulnerability of the global network to node removal under different scenarios. We found that the network was generally robust to the removal of nodes with high centrality. MOURIER, J. & BROWN, C. & PLANES, S. 2017 Learning and robustness to catch-and-release fishing in a shark social network. Biology Letters, 13 (3): 20160824 http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/13/3/20160824 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Carcharhinus-melanopterus image: Carcharhinus melanopterus (QUOY & GAIMARD, 1824); Moorea © Julia Spät
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Free download! The Red Book of Marine Fishes of Colombia (2017) is the result of a more than three years long process. Forty researchers belonging to 17 national entities, including universities, institutes, government organizations, and NGOs were involved. The work received the advice of the International Union for Conservation of Nature - IUCN, the support of the Ministerio de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sostenible and the endorsement of the Comité Coordinador de Categorización de Especies Amenazadas de Colombia. In the book you can find 103 species datasheets with information on taxonomy, distribution, ecology, population, uses, threats, conservation measures and the category of risk with the corresponding justification. Of these, 56 correspond to threatened species (6 Critically Endangered -CR, 7 Endangered -EN and 43 Vulnerable -VU), including sharks (10 species), rays (6 species) and bony fishes (40 species). The author’s expectations are that this work be of all your interest and pleasure, but especially that it becomes an important tool for the management and conservation of marine fishes in our country. http://www.invemar.org.co/documents/10182/14479/libro-rojo-peces-marinos-de-colombia.pdf
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Thanks to Michael Drew for the new paper about Carcharhinus brachyurus! The present study provides the first length-at-age, growth and maturity estimates for the bronze whaler (Carcharhinus brachyurus) from Australian waters. Growth-model parameters combined with reproductive information identified C. brachyurus to be long-lived, slow growing and late maturing. These life-history characteristics highlight the potential vulnerability of C. brachyurus to anthropogenic impacts. DREW, M. & ROGERS, P. & HUVENEERS, C. 2017 Slow life-history traits of a neritic predator, the bronze whaler (Carcharhinus brachyurus). Marine and Freshwater Research, 68 (3): 461–472 http://www.publish.csiro.au/MF/MF15399 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Carcharhinus-brachyurus image: Carcharhinus brachyurus by Andy Murch, Elasmodiver.com
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The present study reports the geographically sympatric and ecologically syntopic occurrence of two young-of-the-year (YOY) cownose rays, namely Rhinoptera bonasus and R. brasiliensis. The tactics adopted by the species can increase the chances of survival and feeding success during the first weeks/months of life. Thus, we believe that this work can contribute to a better understanding of this species and be very useful for others studies, providing data on migration and habitat use patterns. Thanks a lot to bianca Rangel for this new paper and the image for the post. RANGEL, B.S. &, PAES DA CRUZ, V. & RODRIGUES, A. & GÓES DE ARAUJO, M.L. & OLIVEIRA, C. & FORESTI, F. & GUIMARÃES MOREIRA, R. 2017 Sympatric and syntopic occurrence of cownose rays: Neonatal strategies for survival? Journal of Applied Ichthyology, in press http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1111/jai.13343/abstract http://shark-references.com/species/view/Rhinoptera-bonasus http://shark-references.com/species/view/Rhinoptera-brasiliensis
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Many thanks to Henri Cappetta and Dr. Günter Schweigert (editor of Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Abhandlungen, https://www.schweizerbart.de/journals/njgpa?l=EN) for this new paper and the permission to use this amazing image of two different Eotorpedo species for this post! Detailed fieldwork of 9 new well-drillings allowed us to establish the first exhaustive list of the Matam selachian fauna with their biostratigraphical distribution through five main fossiliferous levels spanning the Thanetian-Early Lutetian period. Their importance for biochronological, paleoenvironmental purposes and correlations with the other Eocene phosphate deposits worldwide is noteworthy. The Matam selachian is represented by 38 species belonging to 34 genera, 16 families and 6 orders! SAMBOU, B.S. & SARR, R. & HAUTIER, L. & CAPPETTA, H. & ADNET, S. 2017 The selachian fauna (sharks and rays) of the phosphate series of Ndendouri-Ouali Diala (Matam, Western Senegal): Dating and paleoenvironmental interests. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie, Abhandlungen, 283 (2): 205-219
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A specimen of the rare Japanese prickly dogfish, known also as the Japanese roughshark, Oxynotus japonicus Yano et Murofushi, 1985, was recently collected from the north-eastern Taiwan at the Daxi fish market. It represents the first record of the family, the genus, and the species in Taiwan. Moreover, previous records were based on only 8 known specimens and the Taiwanese specimen represents the 9th specimen in the world. Many thanks to Dr. Hsuan-Ching Ho, National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Pingtung, Taiwan for the permission to use the image at shark-references. http://shark-references.com/species/view/Oxynotus-japonicus HO, H.C. & NAKAYA, K. 2016 New record of the Japanese roughshark, Oxynotus japonicus Yano et Murofushi, 1985 (Elasmobranchii: Squaliformes: Oxynotidae) in Taiwan. Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria, 46 (4): 357–360
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Study shows how skates, rays and sharks sense electrical fields Elegant experiments trace biology of intriguing sensory ability from genes to behavior Date: March 6, 2017 Source: University of California - San Francisco Summary: Sharks, rays and skates can hunt for prey hidden in the sandy sea floor by 'listening' for faint traces of bioelectricity -- they can literally sense their prey's heart beating. The basic anatomy of the electro-sensory organs that accomplish this feat has been known for decades, but the biological mechanisms -- how electrosensory cells pick up faint electrical signs of life -- has remained a puzzle. research paper: Nicholas W. Bellono, Duncan B. Leitch, David Julius. Molecular basis of ancestral vertebrate electroreception. Nature, 2017; DOI: 10.1038/nature21401 http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature21401.html image: This is an Ampullary bundle with afferent nerve. Credit: Julius Lab, UCSF
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The newsletter March is now online! Enjoy it :-) http://shark-references.com/post/706 Subscribe to our newsletter! http://eepurl.com/sJNGb image: A pictorial atlas of fossil remains : consisting of coloured illustrations selected from Parkinson's "Organic remains of a former world," and Artis's "Antediluvian phytology" / with descriptions by Gideon Algernon Mantell.
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The secret drama of an angel shark's life! By the end of February 2017, I received some extraordinary images of an angel shark that presented a large wound apparently caused by a strong bite from another predator.... full story by Fernando Reis, Sharks Educational Institute, 1st March 2017 http://sharkseducational.simplesite.com/432029463 image: Angel shark wounded. She has been bitten two times during the attack.
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New paper about diet of three shark species (Carcharhinus falciformis, Carcharhinus limbatus and Nasolamia velox) in the Ecuadorian Pacific, Thanks to Colombo Estupiñán (research director of Fundación Alium Pacific, https://www.facebook.com/fundacionaliumpacific/) for this new paper! The authors analysed the stomach contents of 69 silky sharks Carcharhinus falciformis, 44 blacktip sharks Carcharhinus limbatus and 24 whitenose sharks Nasolamia velox caught in the Ecuadorian Pacific from August 2003 to December 2004. Prey included bony fishes, elasmobranchs, molluscs, crustaceans and turtles, with bony fishes being the most important to the diets of all three sharks, suggesting they are piscivorous predators. ESTUPIÑÁN-MONTAÑO, C. & PACHECO-TRIVIÑO, F. & CEDEÑO-FIGUEROA, L.G. & GALVÁN-MAGAÑA, F. & ESTUPIÑÁN-ORTIZ, J.F. 2017 Diet of three shark species in the Ecuadorian Pacific, Carcharhinus falciformis, Carcharhinus limbatus and Nasolamia velox. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, in press https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-the-marine-biological-association-of-the-united-kingdom/article/div-classtitlediet-of-three-shark-species-in-the-ecuadorian-pacific-span-classitaliccarcharhinus-falciformis-carcharhinus-limbatusspan-and-span-classitalicnasolamia-veloxspandiv/86706923A9D4618B613972297522626E http://shark-references.com/species/view/Carcharhinus-falciformis http://shark-references.com/species/view/Carcharhinus-limbatus http://shark-references.com/species/view/Nasolamia-velox image: Carcharhinus falciformis (MÜLLER & HENLE, 1839), © Alex Chernikh
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Based on these similarities and on the well-recognized relationship between squamation and ecology in sharks, here we explore the ecological diversity and lifestyles of thelodonts. For this we use classic morphometrics and discriminant analysis to characterize the squamation patterns of a significant number of extant shark species whose ecology is well known. Multivariate analyses have defined a characteristic squamation pattern for each ecological group, thus establishing a comparative framework for inferring lifestyles in thelodonts. Thanks to Humberto Gracián Ferrón Jiménez for this open access paper! FERRÓN, H.G. & BOTELLA, H. 2017 Squamation and ecology of thelodonts. PLoS ONE, 12(2): e0172781 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0172781#pone.0172781.s001
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Many thanks to Michael Scholl (Save Our Seas Foundation, https://www.facebook.com/saveourseasngo/) for this new paper about Lemon Sharks! Highlights • Lemon sharks showed a significant preference for familiar individuals. • Capture location and length did not significantly impact interactions. • Findings suggest individuals are potentially capable of individual recognition. • Findings offer explanatory mechanism for wild trials with repeated partnership. KELLER, B.A. & FINGER, J.-S. & GRUBER, S.H. & ABEL, D.C. & GUTTRIDGE, T.L. 2017 The effects of familiarity on the social interactions of juvenile lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 489: 24–31 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022098117300035 http://shark-references.com/species/view/Negaprion-brevirostris image: Negaprion brevirostris (POEY, 1868), © Andy Murch https://www.facebook.com/Elasmodiver/
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Many thanks to Dr. Simon Weigmann, Elasmobranch Research Laboratory, Lüneburg for this amazing image of a adult, male Little skate (Leucoraja erinacea (MITCHILL, 1825)) Please support our database and send your images (juergen.pollerspoeck@shark-references.com)! http://shark-references.com/species/view/Leucoraja-erinacea
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Today is World Wildlife Day! On 20 December 2013, at its 68th session, the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) decided to proclaim 3 March, the day of the adoption of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), as World Wildlife Day. Visit the webpage of CITES about sharks and rays! https://www.cites.org/prog/shark https://www.cites.org/eng/prog/shark/Information_resources_from_Parties_and_other_stakeholders#Shark References
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Check this press release! http://shark-references.com/species/view/Pseudocarcharias-kamoharai
The Shark Trust
First-ever record of a Crocodile Shark (Pseudocarcharias kamoharai) in British waters!!! This is an extraordinary record: Hope Cove, South Devon, is considerably outside of Crocodile Sharks’ known distribution, not to mention their preferred water temperature (tropical). The Crocodile Shark is an uncommon, relatively small (up to 1.2m), oceanic shark, which generally prefers tropical waters. Not a lot else is known about this shark’s biology: its large eyes indicate nocturnal or deep-water activity, while its long, slender teeth suggests they target fast-moving, agile prey. Find out more about the sharks, skates and rays in British waters at www.sharktrust.org/id.
New research results about dermal denticles of shark's!
Save Our Seas Foundation
How do we reconstruct what shark communities used to look like in a time before humans were around to record them? The team from Baseline Caribbean are attempting this, and with great success. Project leader Erin Dillon and her team are extracting tiny shark dermal denticles (shark 'skin') from marine sediments and using these to reconstruct shark communities. Read our interview with Erin at: http://www.saveourseasmagazine.com/conversation-erin-dillon/ In this new paper, they explain the technique and discuss the potentials, pitfalls and limitations of the approach with the aim of building a better understanding of shark communities today and in the past. The study will help interpret fossil and modern collections of dermal denticles when we look how shark communities have changed over time in response to fishing (of sharks themselves and their prey), pollution and habitat change. Read the paper by clicking on the image below.
Many thanks to Brendan Talwar for this amazing image of Squalus cubensis, the Cuban dogfish! for more information please visit: http://shark-references.com/species/view/Squalus-cubensis
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Many thanks to David Morgan for this new paper about sawfishes (Pristidae)! Detailed computational fluid dynamics simulations for the rostrum of three species of sawfish (Pristidae) revealed that negligible turbulent flow is generated from all rostra during lateral swipe prey manipulation and swimming. These results suggest that sawfishes are effective stealth hunters that may not be detected by their teleost prey's lateral line sensory system during pursuits. BRADNEY, D.R. & DAVIDSON, A. & EVANS, S.P. & WUERINGER, B.E. & MORGAN, D.L. & CLAUSEN, P.D. 2017 Sawfishes stealth revealed using computational fluid dynamics. Journal of Fish Biology, in press http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1111/jfb.13255/abstract http://shark-references.com/species/view/Pristis-clavata http://shark-references.com/species/view/Pristis-pristis http://shark-references.com/species/view/Anoxypristis-cuspidata
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