*|MC:SUBJECT|*

 
View this email in your browser
Facebook
Facebook
Website
Website

NEWSLETTER 02/2014 21.02.2014

 
Please acknowledge use of the database www.shark-references.com in your publications, and cite: 

Pollerspöck, J. 2014, Bibliography database of living/fossil sharks, rays and chimaeras (Chondrichtyes: Elasmobranchii, Holocephali), www.shark-references.com, World Wide Web electronic publication, Version 2014
 

PARTNERS OF SHARK-REFERENCES:


Would you like to become a shark-reference partner? Please contanct me per E-mail!
 

         Partner in Google-Maps:                           

 

New images at shark-references:


Many thanks to the following persons for the permission to use their images:
  Please support shark-references and send your images to: info@shark-references.com
 

Missing papers:

Many thanks to all friends of shark-references, who send me some missing papers last month!

Shark-References would kindly like to ask you for your contribution to this project.

Please support www.shark-references.com and send missing papers (not listed papers or papers without the infosymbol) to juergen.pollerspoeck@shark-references.com.

 

 

Meetings:



Northeast Pacific Shark Symposium

Saturday, March 22, 2014 8am-5pm

Join us for a series of 5–15-minute “lightning talks” on current Northeast Pacific shark research.

Event background:

Since 2004 the Seattle Aquarium has hosted biennial cowshark conservation workshops to gather shark biologists to share knowledge about these little-known species. Over the years the meeting has increased in size and scope. In December of 2011 the first Pacific Shark Workshop was held in Vancouver, B.C. Because of the success of this meeting and the growth of the cowshark meeting, the Aquarium, in collaboration with the Pacific Shark Research Center at Moss Landing Marine Labs, California and the IUCN Shark Specialist Group Northeast Regional working group, is launching the Northeast Pacific Shark Symposium.

Reservation cost is $40 per person. Click here to register.

 


The KwaZulu-Natal Sharks Board is pleased to confirm that the second Sharks International symposium will be held in Durban, South Africa on 2-6 June 2014. This is a sequel to the highly successful inaugural Sharks International meeting in Cairns, Australia in June 2010. The meeting will comprise four full days of presentations, commencing Monday 2 June and ending Friday 6 June, with Wednesday 4 June set aside for a variety of exciting mid-conference excursions.
The aim of this conference is to provide a forum for the world’s leading shark and ray researchers, along with students and early career scientists to meet, share ideas, update information and report on the progress of their most recent scientific studies. We would encourage any researchers and students with a general interest in the marine environment to also attend as networking opportunities at a conference of this nature and size are enormous.
For further information please visit the Symposium’s web page at:
http://www.sharksinternational.org
Any queries regarding the symposium can also be sent to the organising committee at:
sharksinternational2014@gmail.com
 



IV Encuentro Colombiano sobre Condrictios:

place: Universidad EAFIT de Medellín, Colombia

date: 20. - 24. October 2014

more information

 
 

New described species/Taxonomic News:

 

Recent:

FONTENELLE, J.P. & DA SILVA, J.P.C.B. & DE CARVALHO, M.R. (2014): Potamotrygon limai, sp. nov., a new species of freshwater stingray from the upper Madeira River system, Amazon basin (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae). Zootaxa, 3765 (3): 249–268

New species: Potamotrygon limai
 
Abstract: Potamotrygon limai, sp. nov., is described from the Jamari River, upper Madeira River system (Amazon basin), state of Rondônia, Brazil. This new species differs from congeners by presenting unique polygonal or concentric patterns formed by small whitish spots better defined over the posterior disc and tail-base regions. Potamotrygon limai, sp. nov., can be further distinguished from congeners in the same basin by other characters in combination, such as two to three rows of midtail spines converging to a single irregular row at level of caudal sting origin, proportions of head, tail and disc, patterns of dermal denticles on rostral, cranial and tail regions, among other features discussed herein. Potamotrygon limai, sp. nov., is most similar to, and occurs sympatrically with, P. scobina, and is distinguished from it by lacking ocellated spots on disc, by its characteristic polygonal pattern on posterior disc, a comparatively much shorter and broader tail, greater intensity of denticles on disc, more midtail spine rows at tail-base, and other features including size at maturity and meristic characters. Potamotrygon limai, sp. nov., is also distinguished from other species of Potamotrygon occurring in the Amazon region, except P. scobina, by presenting three angular cartilages (vs. two or one). This new species was discovered during a detailed taxonomic and morphological revision of the closely related species P. scobina, and highlights the necessity for thorough and all-embracing taxonomic studies, particularly in groups with pronounced endemism and morphological variability.

 

 

Fossil:

CARRILLO-BRICEÑO, J.D. & AGUILERA, O.A. & RODRIGUEZ, F. (2014): Fossil Chondrichthyes from the central eastern Pacific Ocean and their paleoceanographic significance. Journal of South American Earth Sciences, 51: 76–90
 
New species: Chlamydoselachus landinii
 
Abstract: The study of the chondrichthyan fauna from the Angostura, Onzole, Canoa and Jama formations, in the Neogene of Bordón and Manabí basins, Ecuador, reveals the presence of 30 taxa, including the deep water shark †Chlamydoselachus landinii sp. nov. The assemblages are dominated by tropical shallow and deep water chondrichthyans, suggesting paleoenvironments associated with a short platform shelf bordering a deep margin. These assemblages are the most diverse shark and ray association known from the Tropical Central Eastern Pacific Ocean in the South American coastal basin, and provide new information on the paleoecology and paleodiversity of Neogene chondrichthyans.
 
COOK, T.D. & NEWBREY, M.G. & BRINKMAN, D.B. & KIRKLAND, J.I. (2014): Euselachians from the freshwater deposits of the Hell Creek Formation of Montana. Geological Society of America, Special Paper, 503: 229-246, fig. 1-6, A1-A2, tabl. 1.
 
New genus: Restesia
 
New species: Myledaphus pustulosus
 
Abstract: An examination of freshwater euselachian fossils from the Maastrichtian lower and upper Hell Creek Formation, and the Bug Creek Anthills (Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary), and the early Paleocene (Puercan) Tullock Member of the Fort Union Formation of Montana, USA, revealed seven taxa: Lonchidion selachos, Protoginglymostoma estesi, Chiloscyllium, Restesia americana, Ischyrhiza avonicola, Myledaphus pustulosus n. sp., and Dasyatis (Dasyatidae). Squatirhina americana is redescribed to the new genus Restesia based on unique crown morphology. Dasyatis is only reported from the Paleocene. This is in contrast to the other collected taxa, which are only known from the Cretaceous. Ischyrhiza is not reported in our samples from the Hell Creek Formation despite earlier erroneous claims; however, the taxon is present in a sample from the Bug Creek Anthills. We suggest that this taxon infrequently moved into the freshwater rivers to forage. Lonchidion selachos occurs only in the upper Hell Creek Formation, and we hypothesize that the upper Hell Creek localities were deposited during a warm interval, as the paleodistribution of L. selachos shifted signifi cantly to the north during warmer periods in the Santonian and Campanian. Of the taxa found in the Hell Creek Formation and the Bug Creek Anthills, only My ledaphus is found in Paleogene deposits; however, specimens are extremely rare. The occurrence of Myledaphus in the Paleogene is suggested to be due to the occurrence of reworked material.
 
KIRKLAND, J.I. & EATON, J.G. & BRINKMAN, D.B. (2013): Elasmobranchs from upper Cretaceous freshwater facies in southern Utah. In: At the top of the Grand Staircase - The Late Cretaceous of southern Utah. LOEWEN, Alan L. TITUS & Mark A. (eds.), Indian Univ. Press.: 153-194, fig. 9.1-9.22
 
New genera: Cristomylus, Pseudomyledaphus
 
New species: Cantioscyllium markaguntensis, Cristomylus nelsoni, Cristomylus bulldogensis, Cristomylus cifellii, Pseudomyledaphus madseni, Columbusia deblieuxi, Texatrygon brycensis,
 
Abstract: Elasmobranch teeth from freshwater facies are common in many microvertebrate assemblages in the Upper Cretaceous of western North America. Research on the essentially complete Upper Cretaceous terrestrial microvertebrate record of southern Utah has resulted in the collection of specimens from many stratigraphic horizons not sampled elsewhere. Two genera of hybodont shark and two clades of primitive (rhinobatoid and sclerorhynchoid) ray are present throughout the sequence. Orectoloboid sharks fi rst appear in freshwater facies in the Coniacian, and two orectoloboid shark genera are present in the Campanian. Two new genera, Cristomylus and Pseudomyledaphus, are identifi ed as part of a rapidly evolving line of myledaphine rhinobatoid rays; they include the new species Cristomylus nelsoni, Cristomylus bulldogensis, Cristomylus cifellii, and Pseudomyledaphus madseni. Additionally, the sclerorhynchoid saw fi sh Texatrygon brycensis and Columbusia deblieuxi and the orectoloboid shark Cantioscyllium markaguntensis are described.
 
MARTILL, D.M. & DEL STROTHER, P.J.A. & GALLIEN, F. (2014): Acanthorhachis, a new genus of shark from the Carboniferous (Westphalian) of Yorkshire, England. Geological Magazine, in press
 
New genus: Acanthorhachis
 
Abstract: An association of diverse hollow spines and dermal denticles (ichthyoliths) from the Carboniferous (Westphalian) of Todmorden, Yorkshire, England are attributed to a new genus of enigmatic shark that may lie close to Listracanthus Newberry & Worthen, 1870. Scanning electron microscopy shows that denticle morphology is highly variable, but forms a morphocline including elongate multi-spined elements as well as robust dome-like stellate denticles and recurved spinose elements. Histological analysis suggests an absence of enameloid. Continuous variation of form between elongatemulti-cusped spines to boss-like circular denticles shows that all previously described Palaeozoic species of Listracanthus are probably junior synonyms of the type species L. hystrix Newberry & Worthen, 1870. The status of Listracanthus as a surviving ‘Lilliputian’ taxon after the Permian extinction is questioned. Although the new specimen has affinities with Listracanthus, significant differences in the form of the posterior spines on elongate denticles warrants its placement in the new genus Acanthorhachis gen. nov. The family Listracanthidae is erected to accommodate Listracanthus and Acanthorhachis.
 

 
 
 

New Paper

 

Recent Papers:

AICHINO, D.R. & PASTORI, M.C. & RONCATI, H.A. & LEDESMA, M.A. & SWARCA, A.C. & FENOCCHIO, A.S. (2013): Characterization and description of a multiple sex chromosome system in Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes, Myliobatiformes) from the Parana River, Argentina. Genetics and Molecular Research, 12 (3): 2368-2375  http://dx.doi.org/10.4238/2013.January.16.3.
AUSTRALIEN GOUVERNMENT (2014): Draft recovery plan for Sawfish and River Sharks: (Pristis pristis, Pristis zijsron, Pristis clavata, Glyphis glyphis and Glyphis garricki) Commonwealth of Australia 2014
BINEESH, K.K. & AKHILESH, K.V. & SAJEELA, K.A. & ABDUSSAMAD, E.M. & GOPALAKRISHNAN, A. & BASHEER, V.S. & JENA, J.K. (2014): DNA Barcoding Confirms the Occurrence Rare Elasmobranchs in the Arabian Sea of Indian EEZ. Middle East Journal of Scientific Research, 19 (9): 1266-1271  http://dx.doi.org/10.5829/idosi.mejsr.2014.19.9.13662
BITON PORSMOGUER, S. & BĂNARU, D. & BÉAREZ, P. & DEKEYSER, I. & MERCHÁN FORNELINO, M. & BOUDOURESQUE, C.F. (2014): Unexpected Headless and Tailless Fish in the Stomach Content of Shortfin Mako Isurus oxyrinchus. PLoS ONE, 9 (2): e88488  http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0088488
BONNER, S.J. & HOLMBERG, J. (2013): Mark-Recapture with Multiple, Non-Invasive Marks. Biometrics, 69 (3): 766–775  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/biom.12045
BOSSEBOEUF, A. & GAUTIER, A. & AUVRAY, P. & MAZAN, S. & SOURDAINE, P. (2013): Characterization of spermatogonial markers in the mature testis of the dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula L.). Reproduction, 147 (1): 125-139  http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/REP-13-0316
BRUNNSCHWEILER, J.M. & ABRANTES, K.G. & BARNETT, A. (2014): Long-Term Changes in Species Composition and Relative Abundances of Sharks at a Provisioning Site. PLoS ONE, 9 (1): e86682  http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0086682
CAMPANA, S.E. & FISK, A.T. & KLIMLEY, A.P. (2014): Movements of Arctic and northwest Atlantic Greenland sharks (Somniosus microcephalus) monitored with archival satellite pop-up tags suggest long-range migrations. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, in press  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2013.11.001
CARLSON, J.K. & SIMPFENDORFER, C.A (2014): Recovery potential of smalltooth sawfish, Pristis pectinata, in the United States determined using population viability models. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, in press  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aqc.2434
CHRISTIANSEN, H.M. & HUSSEY, N.E. & WINTNER, S.P. & CLIFF, SHELDON, G. & DUDLEY, F.J. & FISK, A.T. (2014): Effect of sample preparation techniques for carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of hydroxyapatite structures in the form of elasmobranch vertebral centra. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 28: 448-456  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rcm.6801
COELHO, R. & ALPIZAR-JARA, R. & ERZINI, K. (2014): Demography of a deep-sea lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) caught in trawl fisheries of the northeastern Atlantic: Application of Leslie matrices with incorporated uncertainties. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, in press  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2014.01.012
COTTON, C.F. & ANDREWS, A.H. & CAILLIET, G.M. & GRUBBS, D. & IRVINE, S.B. & MUSICK, J.A. (2014): Assessment of radiometric dating for age validation of deep-water dogfish (Order: Squaliformes) finspines. Fisheries Research, 151: 107–113  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fishres.2013.10.014
COUTRE, K. & GEDAMKE, T. & RUDDERS, D.B. & DRIGGERS, W.B. & KOESTER, D.M. & SULIKOWSKI, J.A. (2013): Indication of Density-Dependent Changes in Growth and Maturity of the Barndoor Skate on Georges Bank. Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamics, Management, and Ecosystem Science, 5 (1): 260-269  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19425120.2013.824941
COUTURIER, L.I.E. & DUDGEON, C.L. & POLLOCK, K.H. & JAINE, F.R.A. & BENNETT, M.B. & TOWNSEND, K.A. & WEEKS, S.J. & RICHARDSON, A.J. (2014): Population dynamics of the reef manta ray Manta alfredi in eastern Australia. Coral Reefs, in pess  http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00338-014-1126-5
DE SABATA, E. & BELLO, G. & CATALDINI, G. & MANCUSI, C. & SERENA, F. & CLÒ, S. (2013): A seasonal hotspot for Cetorhinus maximus in Apulia, Southern Italy, Mediterranean Sea EEA 17th Annual Scientific Conference, Plymouth (England), 1-3 November 2013.
FALCON, J. & COON, S.L. & BESSEAU, L. & CAZAMEA-CATALAN, D. & FUENTES, M. & MAGNANOU, E. & PAULIN, C.-H. & BOEUF, G. & SAUZET, S. & JORGENSEN, E.H. & MAZAN, S. & WOLF, Y.I. & KOONIN, E.V. & STEINBACH, P.J. & HYODO, S. & KLEIN, D.C. (2014): Drastic neofunctionalization associated with evolution of the timezyme AANAT 500 Mya. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111 (1): 314-319  http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1312634110
FIGUEIREDO, I. & NATÁRIO, I. & MOURA, T. & CARVALHO, M.L. (2013): Modelling the dynamics of the deepwater shark Centroscymnus coelolepis off mainland Portugal. Aquatic Living Resources, 26 (4): 355-364  http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/alr/2013064
FISHER, R.A. & CALL, G.C. & GRUBBS, R.D. (2013): Age, Growth, and Reproductive Biology of Cownose Rays in Chesapeake Bay. Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamics, Management, and Ecosystem Science, 5 (1): 224-235  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19425120.2013.812587
FONTENELLE, J.P. & DA SILVA, J.P.C.B. & DE CARVALHO, M.R. (2014): Potamotrygon limai, sp. nov., a new species of freshwater stingray from the upper Madeira River system, Amazon basin (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae). Zootaxa, 3765 (3): 249–268  http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3765.3.2
GALLAGHER, A.J. & SERAFY, J.E. & COOKE, S.J. & HAMMERSCHLAG, N. (2014): Physiological stress response, reflex impairment, and survival of five sympatric shark species following experimental capture and release. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 496: 207-218  http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps10490
GILES, J.L. & OVENDEN, J.R. & DHARMADI & ALMOJIL, D. & GARVILLES, E. & KHAMPETCH, K. & MANJEBRAYAKATH, H. & RIGINOS, C. (2014): Extensive genetic population structure in the Indo–West Pacific spot-tail shark, Carcharhinus sorrah. Bulletin of Marine Science, 90 (1): 427-454  http://dx.doi.org/10.5343/bms.2013.1009
GRIFFING, D. & LARSON, S. & HOLLANDER, J. & CARPENTER, T. & CHRISTIANSEN, J. & DOSS, C. (2014): Observations on Abundance of Bluntnose Sixgill Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, in an Urban Waterway in Puget Sound, 2003-2005. PLoS ONE, 9 (1): e87081  http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0087081
GUTTERIDGE, A.N. & BENNETT, M.B. (2014): Functional implications of ontogenetically and sexually dimorphic dentition in the eastern shovelnose ray, Aptychotrema rostrata. Journal of Experimental Biology, 217 (2): 192-200  http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.089326
HEUPEL, M.R. & SIMPFENDORFER, C.A. (2014): Importance of environmental and biological drivers in the presence and space use of a reef‑associated shark. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 496: 47-57  http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps10529
HOFFMAYER, E.R. & FRANKS, J.S. & DRIGGERS, W.B. & MCKINNEY, J.A. & HENDON, J.M. & QUATTRO, J.M. (2014): Habitat, movements and environmental preferences of dusky sharks, Carcharhinus obscurus, in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Marine Biology, in press  http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00227-014-2391-0
KELLEY, C.A. & DECKER, S.E. & SILVA, P. & FORREST, J.N. (2014): Gastric Inhibitory Peptide, Serotonin and Glucagon Are Unexpected Chloride Secretagogues in the Rectal Gland of the Skate (Leucoraja erinacea). American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, in press  http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00531.2013
KIMBER, J.A. & SIMS, D.W. & BELLAMY, P.H. & GILL, A.B. (2014): Elasmobranch cognitive ability: using electroreceptive foraging behaviour to demonstrate learning, habituation and memory in a benthic shark. Animal Cognition, 17 (1): 55-65  http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-013-0637-8
KING, J.R. & MCPHIE, R.P. (2014): Preliminary age, growth and maturity estimates of spotted ratfish (Hydrolagus colliei) in British Columbia. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, in press  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2013.11.002
LAMEIRAS, J.L.V. & DA COSTA, O.T.F. & MORONI, F.T. & ARAUJO, J.D. & CARANHAS, S.M.E. & MARQUES, C.M.A. & DOS-SANTOS, M.C. & DUNCAN, W.L.P. (2014): Systemic rhabdomyolysis induced by venom of freshwater stingrays Plesiotrygon iwamae and Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes – Potamotrygonidae) from the Amazon Basin. Toxicon, 77: 105–113  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2013.10.026
LI, N. & SONG, N. & CHENG, G.-P. & GAO, T.-X. (2013): Genetic diversity and population structure of the red stingray, Dasyatis akajei inferred by AFLP marker. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 51: 130–137  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bse.2013.08.009
LIU, X.X. & DEAN, M.N. & YOUSSEFPOUR, H. & SUMMERS, A.P. & EARTHMAN, J.C. (2014): Stress relaxation behavior of tessellated cartilage from the jaws of blue sharks. Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, 29: 68–80  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.08.014
LORANCE, P. (2013): Editorial: Management and monitoring of deep-sea fisheries and stocks. Aquatic Living Resources, 26 (4): 289-291  http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/alr/2013071
MAIA, A. & WILGA, C.D. (2013): Anatomy and muscle activity of the dorsal fins in bamboo sharks and spiny dogfish during turning maneuvers. Journal of Morphology, 274 (11): 1288–1298  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmor.20179
MOORE, A.B.M. (2014): A review of sawfishes (Pristidae) in the Arabian region: diversity, distribution, and functional extinction of large and historically abundant marine vertebrates. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, in press  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aqc.2441
MULVANY, S. & MOTTA, P.J. (2013): The morphology of the cephalic lobes and anterior pectoral fins in six species of batoids. Journal of Morphology, 274 (9): 1070–1083  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmor.20163
NEWMAN, A.S. & MARSHALL, J.N. & COLLIN, S.P. (2013): Visual Eyes: A Quantitative Analysis of the Photoreceptor Layer in Deep-Sea Sharks. Brain, Behavior and Evolution, 82 (4): 237–249  http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000355370
PAIG-TRAN, E.W.M. & KLEINTEICH, T. & SUMMERS, A.P. (2013): The filter pads and filtration mechanisms of the devil rays: Variation at macro and microscopic scales. Journal of Morphology, 274 (9): 1026–1043  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmor.20160
PEREZ-BRAZEN, C.R. & CAILLIET, G.M. & EBERT, D.A. (2014): Reproduction of the sandpaper skate, Bathyraja kincaidii (Garman 1908) in the eastern North Pacific. Environmental Biology of Fishes, in press  http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10641-014-0220-4
PORTER, M.E. & DIAZ, C. & STURM, J.J. & GROTMOL, S. & SUMMERS, A.P. & LONG, J.H. (2014): Built for speed: strain in the cartilaginous vertebral columns of sharks. Zoology, 117 (1): 19–27  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.zool.2013.10.007
POWERS, S.P. & FODRIE, F.J. & SCYPHERS, S.B. & DRYMON, J.M. & SHIPP, R.L. & STUNZ, G.W. (2013): Gulf-Wide Decreases in the Size of Large Coastal Sharks Documented by Generations of Fishermen Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamics, Management, and Ecosystem Science, 5 (1): 93-102
QUINTANA-URZAINQUI, I. & RODRIGUEZ-MOLDES, I. & CANDAL, E. (2014): Developmental, tract-tracing and immunohistochemical study of the peripheral olfactory system in a basal vertebrate: insights on Pax6 neurons migrating along the olfactory nerve. Brain Structure & Function, 219 (1): 85-104  http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00429-012-0486-2
ROBBINS, W.D. & PEDDEMORS, V.M. & KENNELLY, S.J. & IVES, M.C. (2014): Experimental Evaluation of Shark Detection Rates by Aerial Observers. PLoS ONE, 9 (2): e83456  http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0083456
SHEN, T. & LEI, M. & WANG, J. & HE, X. & LI, X. & LI, J. (2014): Molecular cloning, organization, expression and 3D structural analysis of the MHC class Ia gene in the whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum). Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology, 157 (1–2): 111–118  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetimm.2013.10.012
STEHFEST, K.M. & PATTERSON, T.A. & BARNETT, A. & SEMMENS, J.M. (2014): Intraspecific differences in movement, dive behavior and vertical habitat preferences of a key marine apex predator. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 495: 249-262  http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps10563
TOMITA, T. & TANAKA, S. & SATO, K. & NAKAYA, K. (2014): Pectoral Fin of the Megamouth Shark: Skeletal and Muscular Systems, Skin Histology, and Functional Morphology. PLoS ONE, 9 (1): e8620  http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0086205
VEIGA, N. & MOURA, T. & FIGUEIREDO, I. (2013): Spatial overlap between the leafscale gulper shark and the black scabbardfish off Portugal. Aquatic Living Resources, 26 (4): 355-364  http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/alr/2013070
VÉLEZ-ALAVEZ, M. & MÉNDEZ-RODRIGUEZ, L.C. & DE ANDA MONTAÑEZ, J.A. & MEJÍA, C.H. & GALVÁN-MAGAÑA, F. & ZENTENO-SAVÍN, T. (2014): Vitamin C and E concentrations in muscle of elasmobranch and teleost fish. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology, in press  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.01.010
ZHU, L. & YAN, Z. & FENG, M. & PENG, D. & GUO, Y. & HU, X. REN, L. & SUN, Y. (2014): Identification of sturgeon IgD bridges the evolutionary gap between elasmobranchs and teleosts. Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 42 (2): 138-147 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dci.2013.08.020
 

 

Parasitology:

GOLESTANINASAB, M. & MALEK, M. & ROOHI, A. & KARBASSI, A.R. & AMOOZADEH, E. & RASHIDINEJAD, R. & GHAYOUMI, R. & SURES, B. (2014): A survey on bioconcentration capacities of some marine parasitic and free-living organisms in the Gulf of Oman. Ecological Indicators, 37 (A): 99–104  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2013.09.039
PICKERING, M. & CAIRA, J.N. (2013): Differences in Microthrix Form Between Stomach and Spiral Intestine Stages of the Cestode, Trilocularia: Interspecific Variation or Development? Journal of Parasitology, 99 (6): 1099-1105  http://dx.doi.org/10.1645/13-291.1
YOUNG, J.M. & FRASCA, S. & GRUBER, S.H. & BENZ, G.W. (2013): Monogenoid Infection of Neonatal and Older Juvenile Lemon Sharks, Negaprion brevirostris (Carcharhinidae), in a Shark Nursery. Journal of Parasitology, 99 (6): 1151-1154  http://dx.doi.org/10.1645/GE-3250.1


 

Fossil:

CARRILLO-BRICEÑO, J.D. & AGUILERA, O.A. & RODRIGUEZ, F. (2014): Fossil Chondrichthyes from the central eastern Pacific Ocean and their paleoceanographic significance. Journal of South American Earth Sciences, 51: 76–90  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsames.2014.01.001
COOK, T.D. & NEWBREY, M.G. & BRINKMAN, D.B. & KIRKLAND, J.I. (2014): Euselachians from the freshwater deposits of the Hell Creek Formation of Montana. Geological Society of America, Special Paper, 503: 229-246, fig. 1-6, A1-A2, tabl. 1.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/2014.2503(08)
KIRKLAND, J.I. & EATON, J.G. & BRINKMAN, D.B. (2013): Elasmobranchs from upper Cretaceous freshwater facies in southern Utah. In: At the top of the Grand Staircase - The Late Cretaceous of southern Utah. LOEWEN, Alan L. TITUS & Mark A. (eds.), Indian Univ. Press.: 153-194, fig. 9.1-9.22
MARTILL, D.M. & DEL STROTHER, P.J.A. & GALLIEN, F. (2014): Acanthorhachis, a new genus of shark from the Carboniferous (Westphalian) of Yorkshire, England. Geological Magazine, in press  http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0016756813000447
SCHULTZ, O. (2013): Catalogus Fossilium Austriae Band 3 - Pisces Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien, ISBN13: 978-3-7001-7238-3, 576 pp 

 
 

MISCELLANEOUS:

source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140122202304.htm

One quarter of the world's cartilaginous fish, namely sharks and rays, face imminent extinction

 
 
One quarter of the world's cartilaginous fish, namely sharks and rays, face extinction within the next few decades, according to the first study to systematically and globally assess their fate.
 
 
New research finds that one quarter of the world's cartilaginous fish, namely sharks and rays, face extinction within the next few decades.
Credit: © Dmytro Smaglov / Fotolia
 

One quarter of the world's cartilaginous fish, namely sharks and rays, face extinction within the next few decades, according to the first study to systematically and globally assess their fate.
The International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN's) Shark Specialist Group (SSG), co-chaired by Nick Dulvy, a Simon Fraser University (SFU) Canada Research Chair in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation in British Columbia, conducted the study.

It was published ineLife journal today.

Previous studies have documented local overfishing of some populations of sharks and rays. But this is the first one to survey their status through out coastal seas and oceans. It reveals that one-quarter (249) of 1,041 known shark, ray and chimaera species globally fall under three threatened categories on the IUCN Red List.

"We now know that many species of sharks and rays, not just the charismatic white sharks, face extinction across the ice-free seas of the world," says Dulvy. "There are no real sanctuaries for sharks where they are safe from overfishing."

Over two decades, the authors applied the IUCN's Red List categories and criteria to the 1,041 species at 17 workshops involving more than 300 experts. They incorporated all available information on distribution, catch, abundance, population trends, habitat use, life histories, threats and conservation measures.

Sharks and rays are at substantially higher risk of extinction than many other animals and have the lowest percentage of species considered safe. Using the IUCN Red List, the authors classified 107 species of rays (including skates) and 74 species of sharks as threatened. Just 23 percent of species were labeled as being Least Concern.

The authors identified two main hotspots for shark and ray depletion -- the Indo-Pacific (particularly the Gulf of Thailand), the Red Sea and the Mediterranean Sea.

"In the most peril are the largest species of rays and sharks, especially those living in relatively shallow water that is accessible to fisheries. The combined effects of overexploitation -- especially for the lucrative shark fin soup market -- and habit degradation are most severe for the 90 species found in freshwater.

"A whole bunch of wildly charismatic species is at risk. Rays, including the majestic manta and devil rays, are generally worse off than sharks. Unless binding commitments to protect these fish are made now, there is a real risk that our grandchildren won't see sharks and rays in the wild."

Losing these fish will be like losing whole chapters of our evolutionary history says Dulvy. "They are the only living representatives of the first lineage to have jaws, brains, placentas and the modern immune system of vertebrates."

The potential loss of the largest species is frightening for many reasons, says Dulvy. "The biggest species tend to have the greatest predatory role. The loss of top or apex predators cascades throughout marine ecosystems."

The IUCN SSG is calling on governments to safeguard sharks, rays and chimaeras through a variety of measures, including the following: prohibition on catching the most threatened species, science-based fisheries quotas, protection of key habitats and improved enforcement.

 

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Simon Fraser University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. N. K. Dulvy, S. L. Fowler, J. A. Musick, R. D. Cavanagh, P. M. Kyne, L. R. Harrison, J. K. Carlson, L. N. Davidson, S. V. Fordham, M. P. Francis, C. M. Pollock, C. A. Simpfendorfer, G. H. Burgess, K. E. Carpenter, L. J. Compagno, D. A. Ebert, C. Gibson, M. R. Heupel, S. R. Livingstone, J. C. Sanciangco, J. D. Stevens, S. Valenti, W. T. White. Extinction risk and conservation of the world's sharks and rays. eLife, 2014; 3 (0): e00590 DOI: 10.7554/eLife.00590
 
 
 
 
source: http://www.grindtv.com/outdoor/nature/post/rare-image-shows-great-white-shark-losing-tooth-during-airborne-attack-on-seal/

 

Rare image shows great white shark losing tooth during airborne attack on sealDavid Jenkins didn't spot flying tooth until he zoomed in on unique photo

February 10, 2014 by 

great white shark

Rare image shows great white shark losing tooth during airborne attack on seal; photo by David Jenkins/Caters News Agency

A photographer off South Africa recently captured the moment a large great white shark breached the surface during an ambush attack on an unsuspecting seal.

What he soon found out was that in one of his images was a large triangular-shaped tooth, flying through the air.

David Jenkins (pictured) spent weeks trying to capture the perfect shark attack image. Photo via Caters News Agency

Not a big deal for the shark. Great whites possess the ability to replace lost teeth rather quickly, and may lose more than 35,000 teeth in a lifetime.

But it was a huge deal for the photographer, David Jenkins, because his rare image reveals more about the dynamics of a white shark’s ambush attack.

“It all happened incredibly quickly,” he told the Daily Mail. “I didn’t know the shark had lost its tooth until I zoomed in on the image in the back of my camera to check if the photo was sharp and in focus.

“I have never seen this happen or even seen a photo of this happening on a real seal hunt before. It’s definitely a unique shot.”

The waters near Cape Town boast a large population of great white sharks, which sometimes launch airborne during their attacks. (Posted below is a super-slow-motion video showing the event.)


Jenkins, 41, said he had spent weeks on boats trying to obtain the perfect shot and knew this day could be productive, because the cloud cover had turned everything gray.

“The clouds make it much more difficult for the seal to spot the shark and its gray back makes for perfect camouflage,” he explained. “The final pictures were definitely worth the wait, and I would do it all again in a heartbeat.”