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NEWSLETTER 05/2023 30.05.2023

 
 
Please acknowledge use of the database www.shark-references.com in your publications, and cite: 

Pollerspöck, J. & Straube, N. 2023, Bibliography database of living/fossil sharks, rays and chimaeras (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii, Holocephali), www.shark-references.com, World Wide Web electronic publication, Version 2023
 
NEWS/ OWN RESEARCH
 
new papers coming soon :-)
 
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ADJUSTMENT OF CITATION STYLE IN SHARK REFERENCES

We started to change our old (and unique!) citation style to adapt to the APA citation style (for information please see: https://www.mendeley.com/guides/apa-citation-guide) to make the usage of references listed in shark references easier and more compatible with a widely accepted reference style adopted by several international scientific journals. The transition is ongoing, so far 25657 (last month: 25529) references are changed.

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NEW PARTNERS OF SHARK-REFERENCES


Would you like to become a shark-reference partner? Please contact us per E-mail!

Partner in Google-Maps

  
                        
 

 

NEW SECTION: From now on, we will report last month’s most popular three papers from our Shark References Facebook page:


If you would like us to post information about your newly published work, please send us a picture and the paper as a pdf to nicolas.straube@shark-references.com or juergen.pollerspoeck@shark-references.com.
 


Nr. 1 (63 Likes/Emojis, 24 Shares):


White, W.T. & O'Neill, H.L. & Devloo-Delva, F. & Nakaya, K. & Iglésias, S.P. 2023 What came first, the shark or the egg? Discovery of a new species of deepwater shark by investigation of egg case morphology. Journal of Fish Biology, in press
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jfb.15415

Abstract: 
Apristurus ovicorrugatus, a new species of deepwater catshark, is described from northwestern Australia. Unique egg cases belonging to an unknown species of Apristurus prompted a more detailed investigation of Apristurus specimens off northwestern Australia. One specimen previously identified as A. sinensis collected off Dampier Archipelago was found gravid with a single egg case. Removal of this egg case confirmed that this species was responsible for producing the unique egg cases previously recorded. The egg cases of this species have strong T-shaped longitudinal ridges on the dorsal and ventral surfaces which are unique in the genus Apristurus. The ridges most closely resemble those present in Bythaelurus canescens from South America, but are larger and always T-shaped. The holotype is closest morphologically to A. sinensis but differs in having a medium brown buccal cavity (vs. jet black), ridged egg cases (vs. smooth egg cases), fewer intestinal spiral valve turns and larger pectoral fins. The holotype is also similar, and closest on a molecular level, to A. nakayai with which it shares a unique synapomorphic character, the white shiny iris (apomorphic within the genus). A late-term embryo removed from an egg case superficially resembled the holotype except in having two parallel rows of enlarged dermal denticles on the dorsolateral predorsal surface. Recent nomenclatural changes to the genera Apristurus and Pentanchus are discussed and challenged. This study highlights the important contribution that egg case morphology has on oviparous elasmobranch taxonomy.

Nr. 2 (46 Likes/Emojis, 9 Shares):

Ng, S.L. & Ho, H.-C. & Joung, S.J. & Liu, K.-M. 2023 Okamejei picta sp. nov., a new rajid skate from the South China Sea (Rajiformes: Rajidae). Zootaxa, 5278(1), 103–118
https://www.biotaxa.org/Zoo.../article/view/zootaxa.5278.1.4
A new species of Okamejei is described based on two adult males collected from deep waters in the South China Sea. The new species, Okamejei picta sp. nov., is readily distinguished from most other congeners in having densely scattered black spots on dorsal disc. Okamejei hollandi and O. mengae is quite similar to the new species by their spot patterns on dorsal disc, but the new species differs from the former by a combination of characters: a yellowish brown dorsal surface densely covered with small, circular to irregular-shaped black spots; blotches on dorsal disc indistinct; posterior ocellus absent; ventral disc white; disc length 45.0–47.7% TL; distance between cloaca to caudal-fin tip 53.6–55.1% TL; trunk centra 31; total basal radials 73–76, morphology of clasper terminal skeleton, and lacking component funnel at the clasper end.

Nr. 3 (28 Likes/Emojis, 8 Shares):

Serrat, A. & Farriols, M.T. & Ramírez-Amaro, S. & Ordines, F. &Guijarro, B. & Ferragut-Perello, F. & Massutí, E. 2023 Conservation Status Assessment of Demersal Elasmobranchs in the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean) over the Last Two Decades. Fishes, 8, Article 230
https://www.mdpi.com/2410-3888/8/5/230...#
Abstract:
More than half of the Mediterranean sharks and rays are threatened by fishing exploitation. However, population assessments are limited by the scarcity of specific data on fishing catches. In this study, we assessed temporal trends of the indicators developed within the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive over the last two decades in order to assess the conservation status of demersal sharks and batoids in the Balearic Islands, which represent an important fraction of the bycatch of bottom trawling in this area. On the basis of a georeferenced, fishery-independent dataset of 19 species of elasmobranchs, we analyzed 20 year time series (2002–2021) of nine indicators regarding area distribution, population size, population status, and community structure. Between 30% and 50% of the elasmobranch species and functional groups showed increasing trends in distribution area and population size. This was especially true for batoids, whereas the distribution area and population size of most sharks remained stable over the study period. The remaining indicators showed stability or, in some cases, variable trends. Only in one case did we find a negative trend sustained all along the time series (i.e., the proportion of R. radula large individuals in relation to the reference period). Overall, our results suggest that the populations of elasmobranchs from the Balearic Islands show stable or recovery trends, mainly in terms of distribution area and density. However, it remains elusive whether this community can recover to the levels of more than half a century ago, before the development of the bottom trawl fishery, or whether this apparent current steady state should be interpreted as a new equilibrium.

 

New Images


Many thanks to the following people for providing images:

Frederik Mollen, Elasmobranch Research, Belgium for images of Narke capensis (Gmelin, 1789)


Donna Pieracini for a image of Heterodontus quoyi (Fréminville, 1840)


Jesco Seifert for images of  Squalus hawaiiensis Daly-Engel, Koch, Anderson, Cotton & Grubbs, 2018 and Centrophorus tessellatus Garman, 1906

 
 
 

Missing papers:

Many thanks to all friends of shark-references, who sent us some missing papers last month!

Shark-References would kindly like to ask you for your contribution to this project.

At the moment we are looking for some of the following papers:


Extinct Chondrichthyes:

new entry - Yabe, H. & Obata, T. (1930) Discovery of Ptychodus rugosus Dixon from the Upper Cretaceous of the Japanes Saghalin.  Japanese Journal of Geology and Geography, 7(2), 43–44

new entry - Mansfield, W.C. (1926) Fossils from quarries near Suva, Viti Levu, Fiji Islands, and from Vavao, Tonga Islands, with annotated bibliography of the geology of the Fiji Islands. Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication, 344, 85–104

new entry -  Allen, J.G. & Shimada, K. (2022) Fossil vertebrates from a unique marine bonebed of the Upper Cretaceous Smoky Hill Chalk, western Kansas, USA: new insights into the paleoecology of the Niobrara Formation. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 41(6), Article e2066999

new entry -  Bassani, F. (1880) Appunti su alcuni pesei fossili d'Austria e dei Württemberg. Atti della Soeieta Veneto-Trentina di Seienze Naturali residente in Padova, 7/1880: 74-109, Taf. 8. - Padova.

Numano, M. (1993) Some Neogene shark-teeth from Mogami area, Yamagata Prefecture. Applied Geology of Yamagata, 13: 32–49



Extant Chondrichthyes:

Chu, Y.-T.  (1930) A new species of the swallow ray (Pteroplatea) from China. China Journal, 12(6): 357.

Smith, J.L.B. (1958) The mystery killer, the new shark Carcharhinus vanrooyeni. Veld & Vlei, 3 (9): 12–14, 28.

Deng, S.-M. & Xiong, G.-Q. & Zhan, H.-X. (1988) The deep water fishes of the east China Sea. Xue Lin Publishing house: 356 pp.

Please support www.shark-references.com and send missing papers (not listed papers or papers without the info-symbol) to juergen.pollerspoeck@shark-references.com or nicolas.straube@shark-references.com



 

 

Upcoming Meetings:

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Indo-Pacific Fish Conference and the Australian Society for Fish Biology



20-24 November 2023, Auckland, New Zealand
Keep me updated
  Welcome

We look forward to welcoming you to the University of Auckland, located in the heart of Auckland city.  We invite you to come and meet the people that live and work here, explore our beautiful city and hope that you leave with lasting friends, partnerships and memories.

The Organising Committee look forward to welcoming you to the 11th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference (IPFC) and Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Fish Biology, to be held 20-24 November 2023 at the University of Auckland, New Zealand.

The Indo-Pacific Fish Conference (IPFC), held every four years, is undoubtedly one of the world’s premier ichthyological conferences and is eagerly anticipated by marine, estuarine and freshwater fish enthusiasts alike.

The Australian Society for Fish Biology (ASFB), founded in 1971, aims to promote research, education and management of fish and fisheries across the Indo-Pacific.

We are excited to bring these two conference together in a joint meeting that will reflect the extraordinary biological, environmental and cultural diversity of the vast Indo-Pacific region.

Auckland is a modern city offering a variety of cultural experiences, accommodation and entertainment options for every taste and budget. The city is a key regional hub, with transport connections to multiple cities across New Zealand, Australia, the Pacific and beyond.

The University of Auckland is an internationally recognised university that provides outstanding conference facilities and conference support within easy walking distance of the city centre. An exciting programme of conference field trips will allow attendees to sample the diversity of regional marine and freshwater ecosystems. Before or after the conference, delegates could explore Auckland’s magnificent Hauraki Gulf and its beautiful islands. The jewel of the gulf is Waiheke Island, a haven of vineyards, olive groves, beaches and fine dining, just a 40-minute ferry ride from downtown Auckland. For an exciting day trip, discover the history and sandy coves of Rotoroa Island, explore the open wildlife sanctuary of Tiritiri Matangi Island or climb the volcanic cone of Rangitoto Island for incredible views from the summit. If you have a little more time, travel south for a summer holiday to discover the majestic Milford and Doubtful Sounds, encounter marine life in Abel Tasman National Park, enjoy New Zealand’s beautiful Bay of Islands, or maybe plan a field trip or tropical holiday on one of the many Pacific islands that are only a short flight away from Auckland.

We look forward to welcoming you to Auckland in 2023!


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Fossil Fish symposium at XVII European Congress of Ichthyology 2023, 4th – 8th September 2023, Prague
 
 
On September 4-8, 2023, the European Congress of Ichthyology (ECI XVII) will take place in the wonderful city of Prague (Czech Republic). Following earlier meetings of the informal palaeoichtyologist community in Munich (2019) and Paris (2022), ECI XVII is a great opportunity for our next ‘Fossil Fish symposium’. Please see the attachment for its description.
 
The Website for ECI XVII is: http://eci23.agrobiologie.cz/
Abstract submission deadline is March 30, 2023
Registration deadline is June 15, 2023
We would be very pleased if you would like to attend and to contribute. Please forward this e-mail also to the members of your group and colleagues.
 
With our best wishes and looking forward to seeing you in Prague
 
The organization team of the symposium
Gloria Arratia (University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA)
Olga Otero (Université de Poitiers, France)
Tomáš Přikryl (Institute of Geology, Praha, Czech Republic)
Bettina Reichenbacher (Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany)

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The 8th edition of the
International Meeting on the Valorization and Preservation of Paleontological Heritage (RIV3P8)
November 23 - 25, 2023 (El Jadida - Morocco)
https://sites.google.com/view/riv3p8

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Annual conference

 

94th Annual Meeting of the Palaeontological Society (PalGes) in Jena, 18.-22.9.2023

From Early Life to the Neandertals

For the first time since founding of the Palaeontological Society (PalGes) in Greifswald 1912 the annual meeting takes place in Jena. This is only the second time in Thuringia since the 1925 meeting in Weimar. We, from the Institute of Geosciences (IGW) at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, are glad to invite the members of the Society to our city at the river Saale. The city is a special location, stretching along the river, which is carving into a Muschelkalk plateau with Buntsandstein outcropping below. The surrounding Muschelkalk heights provide marvellous sights over the city. Our institute is located on the slope of the Hausberg in the eastern part of Jena. It was re-founded 1992 and still grows with an increasing number of scientists. Jena houses the most important university of Thuringia and is also a flourishing economic centre with companies like ZEISS and SCHOTT, it is popular for its touristic sights and a wide range of restaurants. The Thuringian palaeontology has a long tradition and is famous for fossils from the Permian, Triassic and Quaternary. We can offer a diverse range of excursions covering fossil sites from the late Palaeozoic to the Quaternary. The organisation of the meeting is supported by colleagues from Thüringischer Geologischer Verein (TGV), Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha, Museum Schloss Bertholdsburg Schleusingen, Research Station of Quaternary Palaeontology Weimar, and Phyletical Museum Jena. We are looking forward to welcome you in Jena and hear your presentations at 94. Annual Meeting of the PalGes in Jena!

The first circular for the meeting was published today and can be downloaded HERE.

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White Sharks Global

Port Lincoln, South Australia, Australia

Sunday 12th to Friday 17th of November 2023

https://whitesharksglobal.com/

The organising committee is pleased to announce the upcoming White Sharks Global conference (Sunday 12th – Friday 17th of November 2023) in Port Lincoln, South Australia, home of the world’s first white shark tourism industry.
 
White Sharks Global is the first international white shark conference in 13 years and will provide a forum for the white shark community and stakeholders to meet, share ideas, and update information and report on recent scientific studies. This conference and associated workshops will facilitate in-depth discussions of key challenges related to white sharks.
 
For more information visit: whitesharksglobal.com and follow @WhiteSharksGlob or contact info@whitesharksglobal.com
 
The last white shark-focused conference was in Hawaii 13 years ago in early 2010 and a lot has research and studies have happened since. 
 
We have planned for five days of conference, with one day free in the middle to allow for a dive trip to the Neptune Islands Group Marine Park. There will be several focused workshops (e.g., supporting the recovery of white shark populations, supporting the management of white shark tourism, managing human-shark conflict), contributed talk sessions (5- and 15-min talks), and poster sessions. Based on previous events and our survey, we are expecting ~150 attendants from across the globe, including research scientists, students, resource managers, public safety officials, wildlife tourism operators, environmental consultants, natural history-based production companies, and television network representatives from countries all over the world such as South Africa, United States, Australia, Mexico, New Zealand, and Canada.
 
[On behalf of the organising committee: Charlie Huveneers (Australia), Christopher Lowe (California), Alison Towner (South Africa), Oscar Sosa-Nishizaki (Mexico), Lauren Meyer (Australia), and Greg Skomal (northwest Atlantic)]
 

 
TAXONOMIC NEWS/ NEW SPECIES


Extant Chondrichthyes:


Ng, S.L. & Ho, H.-C. & Joung, S.J. & Liu, K.-M. (2023) Okamejei picta sp. nov., a new rajid skate from the South China Sea (Rajiformes: Rajidae). Zootaxa, 5278(1), 103–118
New species: Okamejei picta
Abstract: A new species of Okamejei is described based on two adult males collected from deep waters in the South China Sea. The new species, Okamejei picta sp. nov., is readily distinguished from most other congeners in having densely scattered black spots on dorsal disc. Okamejei hollandi and O. mengae is quite similar to the new species by their spot patterns on dorsal disc, but the new species differs from the former by a combination of characters: a yellowish brown dorsal surface densely covered with small, circular to irregular-shaped black spots; blotches on dorsal disc indistinct; posterior ocellus absent; ventral disc white; disc length 45.0–47.7% TL; distance between cloaca to caudal-fin tip 53.6–55.1% TL; trunk centra 31; total basal radials 73–76, morphology of clasper terminal skeleton, and lacking component funnel at the clasper end.

 
White, W.T. & O'Neill, H.L. & Devloo-Delva, F. & Nakaya, K. & Iglésias, S.P. (2023) What came first, the shark or the egg? Discovery of a new species of deepwater shark by investigation of egg case morphology. Journal of Fish Biology, in press
New species: Apristurus ovicorrugatus
AbstractApristurus ovicorrugatus, a new species of deepwater catshark, is described from northwestern Australia. Unique egg cases belonging to an unknown species of Apristurus prompted a more detailed investigation of Apristurus specimens off northwestern Australia. One specimen previously identified as A. sinensis collected off Dampier Archipelago was found gravid with a single egg case. Removal of this egg case confirmed that this species was responsible for producing the unique egg cases previously recorded. The egg cases of this species have strong T-shaped longitudinal ridges on the dorsal and ventral surfaces which are unique in the genus Apristurus. The ridges most closely resemble those present in Bythaelurus canescens from South America, but are larger and always T-shaped. The holotype is closest morphologically to A. sinensis but differs in having a medium brown buccal cavity (vs. jet black), ridged egg cases (vs. smooth egg cases), fewer intestinal spiral valve turns and larger pectoral fins. The holotype is also similar, and closest on a molecular level, to A. nakayai with which it shares a unique synapomorphic character, the white shiny iris (apomorphic within the genus). A late-term embryo removed from an egg case superficially resembled the holotype except in having two parallel rows of enlarged dermal denticles on the dorsolateral predorsal surface. Recent nomenclatural changes to the genera Apristurus and Pentanchus are discussed and challenged. This study highlights the important contribution that egg case morphology has on oviparous elasmobranch taxonomy.
 

Extinct Chondrichthyes:

Itano, W.M. & Duffin, C.J. (2023) An enigmatic chondrichthyan spine from the Visean of Indiana, USA that resembles a median rostral cartilage of Squaloraja (Holocephali, Chimaeriformes). Spanish Journal of Palaeontology, 38, in press
New genus: Sulcacanthus
New species: Sulcacanthus schachti
AbstractSqualoraja is a genus of chimaeriform fishes known from the Early Jurassic. It has a dorsoventrally flattened body and a long median rostral cartilage. Males have a lance-like tenaculum that articulates with a central groove on the dorsal face of the median rostral cartilage. The genus is the only member of the family Squalorajidae, itself the only family in the suborder Squalorajoidei of the order Chimaeriformes. Phylogenetic analyses suggest a divergence of the Squalorajoidei from other Chimaeriformes in the Mississippian, implying the existence of a ghost lineage of more than 130 My. A spine that resembles a median rostral cartilage of a male Squaloraja was found in the St. Louis Formation (Visean) of Indiana, USA. As in Squaloraja, the dorsal face has a long narrow groove that would have articulated with a long narrow tenaculum. The spine is designated as the holotype of Sulcacanthus schachti, n. gen. et sp. Sulcacanthus is tentatively assigned to the Squalorajoidei based on morphology, but the possibility of convergence cannot be eliminated. A holocephalan tenaculum from the same locality might belong to the same taxon as the median rostral cartilage but could also belong to the suborder Myriacanthoidei.

Parasites:
no news this month!

 

PLEASE send your new papers to
juergen.pollerspoeck@shark-references.com or 
nicolas.straube@shark-references.com   


Latest Research Articles

Extant Chondrichthyes:
Adams, L. & Lyons, K. & Monday, J. & Larkin, E. & Wyffels, J. (2023): Costs of parthenogenesis on growth and longevity in ex situ zebra sharks Stegostoma tigrinum. Endangered Species Research, 50, 81–91 https://dx.doi.org/10.3354/esr01224
Aglieri, G. & Quattrocchi, F. & Mariani, S. & Baillie, C. & Spatafora, D. & Di Franco, A. & Turco, G. & Tolone, M. & Di Gerlando, R. & Milazzo, M. (2023): Fish eDNA detections in ports mirror fishing fleet activities and highlight the spread of non-indigenous species in the Mediterranean Sea. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 189, Article 114792  https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2023.114792
Alves, L.M.F. & Moutinho, A.B. & Gomez, L.J. & Oropesa, A.L. & Munoz-Arnanz, J. & Jimenez, B. & Lemos, M.F.L. & Fonseca, V.F. & Cabral, H. & Novais, S.C. (2023): Evidence of contamination-associated damage in blue sharks (Prionace glauca) from the Northeast Atlantic. Science of the Total Environment, 872, Article 162095  https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.162095
Aoki, D.M. & Perrault, J.R. & Hoffmann, S.L. & Guertin, J.R. & Page-Karjian, A. & Stacy, B.A. & Lowry, D. (2023): Forensic determination of shark species as predators and scavengers of sea turtles in Florida and Alabama, USA. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 703, 145–159 https://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps14214
Besnard, L. & Lucca, B.M. & Shipley, O.N. & Le Croizier, G. & Martinez-Rincon, R.O. & Sonke, J.E. & Point, D. & Galvan-Magana, F. & Kraffe, E. & Kwon, S.Y. & Schaal, G. (2023): Mercury isotope clocks predict coastal residency and migration timing of hammerhead sharks. Journal of Applied Ecology, 60(5), 751–949 https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.14384
Bilgili, A. & Kabasakal, H. (2023): Encounters with threatened batoids from the perspective of a spearfisherman suggesting an aggregation site in southeastern Aegean Sea, Turkey. Regional Studies in Marine Science, 61, Article 102894 https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rsma.2023.102894
Binstock, A.L. & Richards, T.M. & Wells, R.J.D. & Drymon, J.M. & Gibson-Banks, K. & Streich, M.K. & Stunz, G.W. & White, C.F. & Whitney, N.M. & Mohan, J.A. (2023): Variable post-release mortality in common shark species captured in Texas shore-based recreational fisheries. Plos One, 18(2), Article e0281441 https://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0281441
Bourke, E. & Raoult, V. & Williamson, J.E. & Gaston, T.F. (2023): Estuary Stingray (Dasyatis fluviorum) Behaviour Does Not Change in Response to Drone Altitude. Drones, 7(3), Article 164 https://dx.doi.org/10.3390/drones7030164
Burgos-Vazquez, M.I. & Cruz-Escalona, V.H. & Hernandez-Camacho, C.J. & Pena, R. & Ceballos-Vazquez, B.P. & Mejia-Falla, P.A. (2023): Contrasting the reproductive potential of Narcine entemedor and Rhinoptera steindachneri: 2 viviparous batoid species with different reproductive strategies. Ciencias Marinas, 49, Article e3303  https://dx.doi.org/10.7773/cm.y2023.3303
Cahill, B.V. & McCulloch, K.L. & DeGroot, B.C. & Bassos-Hull, K. & Ajemian, M.J. (2023): Breaking bags and crunching clams: assessing whitespotted eagle ray interactions with hard clam aquaculture gear. Aquaculture Environment Interactions, 15, 59–71 https://dx.doi.org/10.3354/aei00452
Calle-Moran, M.D. & Oddone, M.C. & Marquez-Farias, J.F. & Bonfil, R. (2023): Size structure, length-body mass relationship, and relative condition factor of the crocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai, in the Southeastern Pacific Ocean, Ecuador. Regional Studies in Marine Science, 60, Article 102890 https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rsma.2023.102890
Carbonara, P. & Prato, G. & Niedermuller, S. & Alfonso, S. & Neglia, C. & Donnaloia, M. & Lembo, G. & Spedicato, M.T. (2023): Mitigating effects on target and by-catch species fished by drifting longlines using circle hooks in the South Adriatic Sea (Central Mediterranean). Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, Article 1124093 https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2023.1124093
Cardenosa, D. & Robles, Y.L. & Ussa, D.A. & del Valle, C.M. & Caballero, S. & Chapman, D.D. (2023): Pre-export shark fin processing to conceal CITES-listed species: a case-study from a shark fin seizure in Colombia. Animal Conservation, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acv.12864
Catanese, G. & Grau, A. (2023): First Detection of Photobacterium spp. in Acute Hemorrhagic Septicemia from the Nursehound Shark Scyliorhinus stellaris. Fishes, 8(3), Article 128 https://dx.doi.org/10.3390/fishes8030128
Cruz, V.P. & Rotundo, M.M. & Charvet, P. & Boza, B.R. & Souza, B.C. & Cerqueira, N. & Oliveira, C. & Lessa, R. & Foresti, F. (2023): Investigating an Unknown Biodiversity: Evidence of Distinct Lineages of the Endemic Chola Guitarfish Pseudobatos percellens Walbaum, 1792 in the Western Atlantic Ocean. Diversity, 15(3), Article 344 https://dx.doi.org/10.3390/d15030344
Dutta, S. & Paul, S. & Homechaudhuri, S. (2023): Food web structure and trophic interactions of the Northern Bay of Bengal ecosystem. Regional Studies in Marine Science, 61, Article 102861 https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rsma.2023.102861
Ferreira, A.M.V. & Viana, P.F. & Marajo, L. & Feldberg, E. (2023): Karyotypic variation of two populations of the small freshwater stingray Potamotrygon wallacei Carvalho, Rosa & Araujo 2016: A classical and molecular approach. Plos One, 18(1), Article e0278828 https://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0278828
Fuentes, S.N. & Andrade, M.C.D. & Awruch, C.A. & Moya, A.C. & Arias, A.H. (2023): Impacts of water pollutants on chondrichthyans species from South America: A review. Chemosphere, 324, Article 138262 https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2023.138262
Gajic, A.A. & Karalic, E. & Besirovic, H. & Sulikowski, J. (2023): The first record of gravid spiny butterfly ray (Gymnura altavela) in the northern Mediterranean Sea, with description of near-term foetuses. Journal of Fish Biology, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfb.15387
Galindo-Rosado, M.A. & Galvan-Magana, F. & Torres-Rojas, Y.E. & Delgado-Huertas, A. & Aguiniga-Garcia, S. (2023): Use of delta(15)n and delta(13)c in reconstructing the ontogenetic feeding habits of silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis): reassessing their trophic role in the eastern tropical pacific ocean. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 106, 657–671 https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10641-023-01404-2
Gallagher, A.J. & Shipley, O.N. & De Silva, C. & Kohler, J.K. & Fernandes, T.F. & Austin, T. & Ormond, R.F. & Gore, M.A. (2023): First records of the blurred lantern shark Etmopterus bigelowi from the Cayman Islands, Western Atlantic. Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, Article 1165207 https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2023.1165207
Gayford, J.H. (2023): The evolution of sexual dimorphism in Chondrichthyes: drivers, uncertainties, and future directions. Environmental Biology of Fishes, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10641-023-01425-x
Gayford, J.H. & Whitehead, D.A. & Ketchum, J.T. & Field, D.J. (2023): The selective drivers of allometry in sharks (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlac110
Gomez-Vargas, N. & Alonso-Fernandez, A. & Blanquero, R. & Antelo, L.T. (2023): Re-identification of fish individuals of undulate skate via deep learning within a few-shot context. Ecological Informatics, 75, Article 102036 https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoinf.2023.102036
Grobler, D.L. & Klein, J.D. & Quattro, J.M. & Bolaño-Martínez, N. & Bennett, R.H. & Bester-van der Merwe, A.E. (2023): Phylogenetic placement and molecular dating of hammerhead sharks (Sphyrnidae) based on whole mitogenomes. Marine Biology Research, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17451000.2023.2194060
Hoschke, A.M. & Whisson, G.J. & Haulsee, D. (2023): Population distribution, aggregation sites and seasonal occurrence of Australia's western population of the grey nurse shark Carcharias taurus. Endangered Species Research, 50, 107–123 https://dx.doi.org/10.3354/esr01225
Ichsan, M. & Herman (2023): Conservation of thresher shark (Family: Alopiidae) in South-west Aceh. Animal Conservation, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acv.12859
Iijima, M. & Komatsu, K. & Kagi, H. & Maekawa, Y. & Sasaki, T. & Hyodo, S. & Kimura, R. & Futami, T. & Suzuki, M. (2023): Hydroxyapatite in Whitlockite-Based Hypermineralized Hard Tissue of Elephant Shark (Callorhinchus milii) Tooth Plate. Crystal Growth & Design, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.cgd.2c00820
Kendler, S. & Thornes, F.W. & Jakobsen, A.N. & Lerfall, J. (2023): Nutritional profiling and contaminant levels of five underutilized fish species in Norway. Frontiers in Nutrition, 10, Article 1118094 https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2023.1118094
Kerr, E.N. & Papudeshi, B. & Haggerty, M. & Wild, N. & Goodman, A.Z. & Lima, L.F.O. & Hesse, R.D. & Skye, A. & Mallawaarachchi, V. & Johri, S. & Parker, S. & Dinsdale, E.A. (2023): Stingray epidermal microbiomes are species-specific with local adaptations. Frontiers in Microbiology, 14, Article 1031711 https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2023.1031711
Kor, K. & Jannat, B. & Ershadifar, H. & Ghazilou, A. (2023): Microplastic occurrence in finfish and shellfish from the mangroves of the northern Gulf of Oman. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 189, Article 114788  https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2023.114788
Kotas, J.E. & Vizuete, E.P. & dos Santos, R.A. & Baggio, M.R. & Salge, P.G. & Barreto, R. (2023): PAN Tubarões: Primeiro Ciclo do Plano de Ação Nacional para a Conservação dos Tubarões e Raias Marinhos Ameaçados de Extinção. Brasília (DF), ICMBio/CEPSUL, 2023, 384p.
LaFreniere, B.R. & Sosa-Nishizaki, O. & Herzka, S.Z. & Snodgrass, O. & Dewar, H. & Miller, N. & Wells, R.J.D. & Mohan, J.A. (2023): Vertebral Chemistry Distinguishes Nursery Habitats of Juvenile Shortfin Mako in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. Marine and Coastal Fisheries, 15(2), Article e10234  https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mcf2.10234
Lemke, L.R. & Simpfendorfer, C.A. (2023): Gillnet size selectivity of shark and ray species from Queensland, Australia. Fisheries Management and Ecology, 30(3), 229–331 https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/fme.12620
Li, Z.Z. & Pethybridge, H.R. & Wu, F. & Li, Y.K. (2023): Mercury bioaccumulation in thresher sharks from the eastern tropical Pacific: Influences of body size, maturation stage, and feeding habitat. Science of the Total Environment, 872, Article 162248 https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.162248
Lindgren, E. & Strote, J. (2023): The seven day itch: A delayed histamine reaction to stingray injury. American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 66, Article   https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2023.01.039
Loh, K.H. & Lim, K.C. & Then, A.Y.H. & Adam, S. & Leung, A.J.X. & Hu, W.J. & Bong, C.W. & Wang, A.J. & Sade, A. & Musel, J. & Du, J.G. (2023): Advancing DNA Barcoding to Elucidate Elasmobranch Biodiversity in Malaysian Waters. Animals, 13(6), Article 1002 https://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani13061002
Matupang, D.M. & Zulkifli, H.I. & Arnold, J. & Lazim, A.M. & Ghaffar, M.A. & Musa, S.M. (2023): Tropical sharks feasting on and swimming through microplastics: First evidence from Malaysia. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 189, Article 114762  https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2023.114762
Melis, R. & Vacca, L. & Cariani, A. & Carugati, L. & Cau, A. & Charilaou, C. & Di Crescenzo, S. & Ferrari, A. & Follesa, M.C. & Hemida, F. & Helyar, S. & Lo Brutto, S. & Sion, L. & Tinti, F. & Cannas, R. (2023): Commercial sharks under scrutiny: Baseline genetic distinctiveness supports structured populations of small-spotted catsharks in the Mediterranean Sea. Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, Article 1050055  https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2023.1050055
Moore, A.B.M. (2023): A ray of hope? The re-appearance of Irish Sea skate decades after local extinction. Journal of Fish Biology, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfb.15385
Moore,A.B.M. & Heney, C. & Lincoln, H. & Colvin, C. & Newell, H. & Turner, R. & McCarthy, I.D. & Hold, N. (2023): Bycatch in northeast Atlantic lobster and crab pot fisheries (Irish Sea, Celtic Sea and Bristol Channel). Fisheries Research, 265, Article 106745 https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fishres.2023.106745
Moyer, J.K. & Dodd, J. (2023): Feeding kinematics and ethology of Blue Sharks, Prionace glauca (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae). Environmental Biology of Fishes, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10641-023-01408-y
Nevatte, R.J. & Williamson, J.E. & Gillings, M.R. (2023): First evidence of multiple paternity and hybridisation in Australian sawsharks. Marine and Freshwater Research, 74(7), 586–600 https://dx.doi.org/10.1071/MF22234
Ng, S.L. & Ho, H.-C. & Joung, S.J. & Liu, K.-M. (2023): Okamejei picta sp. nov., a new rajid skate from the South China Sea (Rajiformes: Rajidae). Zootaxa, 5278(1), 103–118 https://dx.doi.org/10.11646/ZOOTAXA.5278.1.4
O'Connell, C.P. & Payne, M. & Payne, S. & Eller, L.J. & Shaw, J. & McGregor, A. & Rerekura, A. & Stewart, M. & Fox, A. (2023): Observations of Multiple Young-of-the-Year to Juvenile White Sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) within South-West Australian Waters and Its Implications for a Potential Nursery Area(s). Journal of Marine Science and Engineering, 11(3), Article 563 https://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jmse11030563
Ohishi, Y. & Arimura, S. & Shimoyama, K. & Yamada, K. & Yamauchi, S. & Horie, T. & Hyodo, S. & Kuraku, S. (2023): Egg Yolk Protein Homologs Identified in Live-Bearing Sharks: Co-Opted in the Lecithotrophy-to-Matrotrophy Shift? Genome Biology and Evolution, 15(3), Article evad028 https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gbe/evad028
Omeyer, L.C.M. & Duncan, E.M. & Abreo, N.A.S. & Acebes, J.M.V. & AngSinco-Jimenez, L.A. & Anuar, S.T. & Aragones, L.V. & Araujo, G. & Carrasco, L.R. & Chua, M.A.H. & Cordova, M.R. & Dewanti, L.P. & Espiritu, E.Q. & Garay, J.B. & Germanov, E.S. & Getliff, J. & Horcajo-Berna, E. & Ibrahim, Y.S. & Jaafar, Z. & Janairo, J.I.B. & Gyi, T.K. & Kreb, D. & Lim, C.L. & Lyons, Y. & Mustika, P.L.K. & Neo, M.L. & Ng, S.Z.H. & Pasaribu, B. & Pariatamby, A. & Peter, C. & Porter, L. & Purba, N.P. & Cruz, E.T.S. & Shams, S. & Thompson, K.F. & Torres, D.S. & Westerlaken, R. & Wongtawan, T. & Godley, B.J. (2023): Interactions between marine megafauna and plastic pollution in Southeast Asia. Science of the Total Environment, 874, Article 162502 https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.162502
Palacios-Barreto, P. & Mar-Silva, A.F. & Bayona-Vasquez, N.J. & Adams, D.H. & Diaz-Jaimes, P. (2023): Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of the brazilian cownose ray Rhinoptera brasiliensis (Myliobatiformes, Rhinopteridae) in the western Atlantic and its phylogenetic implications. Molecular Biology Reports, 50(5), 4083–4095 https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11033-023-08272-0
Pini-Fitzsimmons, J. & Raoult, V. & Gaston, T. & Knott, N.A. & Brown, C. (2023): Diving into the diet of provisioned smooth stingrays using stable isotope analysis. Journal of Fish Biology, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfb.15370
Rees, J.M. & Sleight, V.A. & Clark, S.J. & Nakamura, T. & Gillis, J.A. & Davey, M.G. (2023): Ectodermal Wnt signaling, cell fate determination, and polarity of the skate gill arch skeleton. Elife, 12, Article e79964 https://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.79964
Rouse, G.W. & Goffredi, S.K. (2023): Osedax (Siboglinidae: Annelida) utilizes shark teeth for nutrition. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 103, e35 https://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0025315423000243
Ruiz-Garcia, D. & Raga, J.A. & March, D. & Colmenero, A.I. & Quattrocchi, F. & Company, J.B. & Recasens, L. & Barria, C. (2023): Spatial distribution of the demersal chondrichthyan community from the western Mediterranean trawl bycatch. Frontiers in Marine Science, 10, Article 1145176 https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2023.1145176
Sailler, A. & Laidebeure, S. & Lecu, A. (2023): Effects of a GnRH vaccine and deslorelin acetate implants in male freshwater stingrays (Potamotrygon sp.). Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, 54(1), 40–48 https://dx.doi.org/10.1638/2022-0090
Santander-Neto, J. & Santana, F.M. & Vasconcelos, J.E. & Lessa, R. (2023): Age and Growth of the Threatened Smalleye Round Ray, Urotrygon microphthalmum, Delsman, 1941, from Northeastern Brazil. Fishes, 8(3), Article 160 https://dx.doi.org/10.3390/fishes8030160
Santos, P.R.S. & Klafke, K. & Gadig, O.B.F. & Garrone-Neto, D. (2023): Retrieving records of a rare and threatened shark in a mosaic of marine-protected areas of southeastern Brazil. Journal of Fish Biology, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfb.15357
Scacco, U. & Di Crescenzo, S. & Sbrana, A. (2023): Exploring fishing threat at fleet segment and subregional scale: Least expert knowledge and a resilience versus disturbance-based approach as conservation's tools for cartilaginous fish. Ecology and Evolution, 13(3), Article e9881 https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.9881
Schieber, J.J. & Fahy, D.P. & Carlson, J.K. & Kerstetter, D.W. (2023): Age, growth and maturity of the yellow stingray (Urobatis jamaicensis), a biannually reproductive tropical batoid. Journal of Fish Biology, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfb.15374
Schiott, S. & Jensen, M.R. & Sigsgaard, E.E. & Moller, P.R. & Avila, M.D. & Thomsen, P.F. & Rysgaard, S. (2023): Environmental DNA metabarcoding reveals seasonal and spatial variation in the vertebrate fauna of Ilulissat Icefjord, Greenland. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 706, 91–108 https://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps14250
Seo, H.S. & Kim, J.H. & Kim, S.H. & Park, M.K. & Seong, N.W. & Kang, G.H. & Kim, J.S. & Kim, S. & Kim, J.C. & Moon, C. (2023): Toxicity of a 90-day repeated oral dose of a collagen peptide derived from skate (Raja kenojei) skin: a rat model study. Toxicological Research, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s43188-023-00175-3
Serrat, A. & Farriols, M.T. & Ramírez-Amaro, S. & Ordines, F. &Guijarro, B. & Ferragut-Perello, F. & Massutí, E. (2023): Conservation Status Assessment of Demersal Elasmobranchs in the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean) over the Last Two Decades. Fishes, 8, Article 230 https://dx.doi.org/10.3390/fishes8050230
Skelton, Z.R. & Kacev, D. & Frable, B.W. & Chang, A. & Costescu, V. & Stabile, D. & Ebert, D.A. (2023): Two's company: first record of two free-swimming megamouth sharks, Megachasma pelagios (Lamniformes: Megachasmidae), off the California coast. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 106, 717–724 https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10641-023-01406-0
Sulikowski, J.A. & Hammerschlag, N. (2023): A novel intrauterine satellite transmitter to identify parturition in large sharks. Science Advances, 9(9), Article eadd6340 https://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.add6340
Thys, K.J.M. & Lemey, L. & Van Bogaert, N. (2023): Blondes do it better? A comparative study on the morphometry and life-history traits of commercially important skates blonde ray Raja brachyura, thornback ray Raja clavata, and spotted ray Raja montagui, with management implications. Fisheries Research, 263, Article 106679 https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fishres.2023.106679
Weideli, O.C. & Daly, R. & Peel, L.R. & Heithaus, M.R. & Shivji, M.S. & Planes, S. & Papastamatiou, Y.P. (2023): Elucidating the role of competition in driving spatial and trophic niche patterns in sympatric juvenile sharks. Oecologia, 201(3), 673–688 https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-023-05355-4
White, W.T. & O'Neill, H.L. & Devloo-Delva, F. & Nakaya, K. & Iglésias, S.P. (2023): What came first, the shark or the egg? Discovery of a new species of deepwater shark by investigation of egg case morphology. Journal of Fish Biology, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfb.15415
Zemah-Shamir, S. & Zemah-Shamir, Z. & Peled, Y. & Sorensen, O.J.R. & Belkin, I.S. & Portman, M.E. (2023): Comparing spatial management tools to protect highly migratory shark species in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea hot spots. Journal of Environmental Management, 337, Article 117691 https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2023.117691
Zicarelli, G. & Romano, C. & Gallo, S. & Valentino, C. & Bellomo, V.P. & Leonetti, F.L. & Giglio, G. & Neri, A. & Marsili, L. & Milazzo, C. & Faggio, C. & Mancusi, C. & Sperone, E. (2023): Diet and Plastic Ingestion in the Blackmouth Catshark Galeus melastomus, Rafinesque 1810, in Italian Waters. Animals, 13(6), Article 1039  https://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani13061039
 
Extinct Chondrichthyes:
Burrow, C.J. & Desbiens, S. (2023): Teeth and tooth whorls of the stem chondrichthyan Doliodus from the Early Devonian of the Gaspé Sandstone Group, Gaspé Peninsula, Quebec, Canada. Spanish Journal of Palaeontology 38, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.7203/sjp.26372
Feichtinger, I. & Guinot, G. & Pollerspöck, J. & Auer, G. & Ćorić, S. & Kranner, M. & Harzhauser, M. (2023): Environmental forcing and magnitude of the end-Cretaceous extinction among cartilaginous and bony fish at a regional scale [Abstract]. In Book of Abstracts, 4th Virtual Palaeontological Congress, May 8–22nd, 2023, 107


Parasites:
Franzese, S. & Mutti, L.D. & Battista, A.G. & Ivanov, V.A. (2023): Morphology and glandular composition of the myzorhynchus and the remnant apical organ in adult cestodes of the order Rhinebothriidea from batoids off Argentina. Journal of Morphology, 284(4), Article e21573 https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmor.21573
Ste-Marie, E. & Glenner, H. & Rees, D.J. & Hussey, N.E. (2023): First Recorded Occurrence of the Parasitic Barnacle (Anelasma squalicola) on a Greenland Shark (Somniosus microcephalus) in the Canadian Arctic. Journal of Fish Biology, in press https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfb.15421
Vaughan, D.B. & Christison, K.W. & Hansen, H. (2023): Rajonchocotyle Cerfontaine, 1899 (Monogenea: Hexabothriidae) species from South Africa, with discussion of the literary accounts of R. Emarginata (Olsson, 1876). Journal of Parasitology, 109(3), 148–168 https://dx.doi.org/10.1645/22-125
Vaughan, D.B. & Christison, K.W. & Hansen, H. & Bullard, S.A. (2023): Species of Hexabothriidae (Monogenea) may have extensive distribution ranges reflecting multiple host species: evidence from three new South African records. Zootaxa, 5254(2), 151–180  https://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.5254.2.1
 
 

MISCELLANEOUS:



Beyond Jaws




New episode of the podcast Beyond Jaws!

In this episode, we have the privilege of sitting down with Dr. Rima Jabado, the founder of the Alas project and deputy chair of the IUCN Species Survival Commission. As a leading authority in the field, Dr. Jabado has dedicated over two decades to...

https://www.speakupforblue.com/show/beyond-jaws/exploring-the-global-conservation-efforts-for-sharks-and-rays-with-dr-rima-jabado/

Both Beyond Jaws audio and video shows can be followed and subscribed. Beyond Jaws is supported by the Save Our Seas Foundation.
https://saveourseas.com/

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Jaw shapes of 90 shark species show: Evolution driven by habitat

Analysis using X-ray computed tomography and 3D reconstructions

Date: May 16, 2023
Source: University of Vienna
Summary: Researchers investigated how the jaw shape of sharks has changed over the course of evolution. Their conclusion: in the most widespread shark species, the jaws show relatively little variation in shape over millions of years; most variable jaws were found for deep-sea sharks.
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Hammerhead sharks hold their breath on deep water hunts to stay warm

Date: May 11, 2023
Source: University of Hawaii at Manoa
Summary: Scalloped hammerhead sharks hold their breath to keep their bodies warm during deep dives into cold water where they hunt prey such as deep sea squids. This discovery provides important new insights into the physiology and ecology of a species that serves as an important link between the deep and shallow water habitats.
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New IUCN Shark News Newsletter is out!
Download: https://www.iucnssg.org/shark-news.html