Palaeocentroscymnus horvathi

(UNDERWOOD & SCHLÖGL, 2013)


Classification: Elasmobranchii Squaliformes Somniosidae

Reference of the original description
UNDERWOOD, C.J. & SCHLÖGL, J. (2013)
Deep-water chondrichthyans from the Early Miocene of the Vienna Basin (Central Paratethys, Slovakia). Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58 (3): 487–509

Synonyms / new combinations and misspellings
Paraetmopterus horvathi

Types
Palaeocentroscymnus horvathi

Paraetmopterus horvathi
Holotype: SNM: Z 27473;


Description:


Citation: Palaeocentroscymnus horvathi (UNDERWOOD & SCHLÖGL, 2013): In: Database of fossil elasmobranch teeth www.shark-references.com, World Wide Web electronic publication, Version 06/2019

Please send your images of "Palaeocentroscymnus horvathi" to info@shark-references.com

Palaeocentroscymnus horvathi (UNDERWOOD & SCHLÖGL, 2013) © Jürgen Pollerspöck, www.shark-references.com

Distribution Geographic
Cerová−Lieskové, Vienna Basin, Slovakia (type locality); Germany; Austria; Japan

Distribution Strategraphy
Stratum typicum: Lakšárska Nová Ves Formation, late Karpatian = latest Burdigalian); Upper Egerian: Ebelsberg-Formation (clay pit at the farmstead of Graben, Traunpucking, Wallern); Walbertsweiler, Germany; Middle Miocene: Serravallium: Southeastern Spain; Gunma Prefecture, central Japan [25951]

Description
Original diagnose after POLLERSPÖCK & Straube, 2017 [25951]: Diagnosis. Dentition cutting-clutching type, upper and lower teeth always monocuspid, cutting edges of the cusp smooth, no ornamentation or folds, no labial apron, lower teeth strongly labio-lingual compressed, higher than wide, cusp strongly distally inclined, distal heel present, rectangular root, lingual two to three labial foramen above a bulge, labial three to four prominent foramen, no basal groove, upper teeth with compact triangular crown, crown erected, compact root, short lobes, lingual a prominent central foramen. Description. Upper jaw teeth—are single-cusped. The crown is upright and is even in posterior lateral teeth (Fig. 5d, g, h, j) not or only slightly bent distally (Fig. 5e, f). The crown appears more slender and higher in anterior and lateral teeth, respectively. In contrast, posterior teeth show a rather wide and compact crown. A noteworthy character is the partially wellrecognisable crown thickening in the middle (Fig. 5e, h–j). Especially in the area of the thickening, the pulp’s edge is well developed (Fig. 5h, i). The crown is bent convex on the lingual side, while it is only weakly bent labially (Fig. 5b). Upper jaw teeth do not show any kind of ornamentation or enameloid folds. The root is compact, partially rectangular and forms two distinct lobes. These lobes vary depending of the former position of the tooth in the jaw. At the symphysis, the two lobes are reduced to two slender, closely neighbouring tips (Fig. 5a). At all other positions, the lobes appear well developed and point ventrally (Fig. 5c, d, e). There is a central foramen in the middle of the teeth. The crown’s edge appears straight labially without showing an apron. Lower jaw teeth—are labio-lingually compressed, about 1.2–1.9 times higher than wide with the exception of teeth from the mouth corners. The roots of anterior and lateral teeth are distinctly higher compared to the crown, which is strongly bent distally. The crown’s edge is not serrated displaying a distal talon. The cusp never excels the talon. The edge of the pulp is lingually weakly undulating and rises in a weak angle towards the distal talon. Two distinct foramina can be found lingually right below the pulp’s edge in lateral and anterior teeth. Only posterior teeth display a third and fourth foramen distally and in the centre of the root’s surface (Fig. 6b, d). The lingual sides of teeth clearly display the overlapping area to adjacent teeth. This area maximally reaches out from just below the talon to the middle of the root (Fig. 6b, c, d, e). The root is rectangular without a basal groove lingually. On the labial side, the pulp’s edge reaches approximately to the middle of the tooth. There are mostly three to four clearly visible foramina on the labial side. The lower edge of the root appears rather straight, but may show a nick in the middle, which reaches to a central foramen (Fig. 6g).


References
NISHIMATSU, K. & UJIHARA, A. (2019)
Deep-sea elasmobranch fauna with the first descriptions of genera Arynchobatis and Pseudoraja from the Miocene Yatsuo group in Toyama, central Japan. Historical Biology, in press
DOI: 10.1080/08912963.2019.1566325
NISHIMATSU, K. (2019)
Deep-sea elasmobranchs from the late early to middle Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Makino Formation (Awa Group), Japan. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, in press
DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2019.1597729
BRACHER, H. & UNGER, E. & JOST, J. & LÜDI, B. & POLLERSPÖCK, J. (2019)
Haie und Rochen der Molasse. www.molasse-haie-rochen.de, accesed 01.02.2019
POLLERSPÖCK, J. & FLAMMENSBECK, C.K. & STRAUBE, N. (2018)
Palaeocentroscymnus (Chondrichthyes: Somniosidae), a new sleeper shark genus from Miocene deposits of Austria (Europe). Paläontologische Zeitschrift, 92 (3): 443–456
DOI: 10.1007/s12542-017-0398-9
FLAMMENSBECK, C.K. & POLLERSPÖCK, J. & SCHEDEL, F.D.B. & MATZKE, N.J. & STRAUBE, N. (2018)
Of teeth and trees: A fossil tip‐dating approach to infer divergence times of extinct and extant squaliform sharks. Zoologica Scripta, 47 (5): 539-557
DOI: 10.1111/zsc.12299
UNDERWOOD, C.J. & SCHLÖGL, J. (2013)
Deep-water chondrichthyans from the Early Miocene of the Vienna Basin (Central Paratethys, Slovakia). Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58 (3): 487–509
DOI: 10.4202/app.2011.0101